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Archive for the ‘zen thoughts’ Category

The usual response I get when someone is viewing one of my abstract photographs is, “What is it?”

My reply is, “What do you see in it?” That is what I like about interpretive imagery. It is all subjective and I feel it when a photo touches and entices the viewer to stop and investigate, it is a success.

Asteroids

Northern Lights

Solar Flare

Abstract photographs are all how about the subject makes you feel. When your subject is color, texture and shapes assembled into a dynamic composition that departs from reality the challenge is on to grab the viewer’s attention.
Working on interpretive imagery goes beyond the usual rules of landscape photography. It is both fascinating and compelling changing one’s perception.
A visual encounter with some watercolor painting presented splashes of blending colors and non-uniform shapes. These macro images are but small pieces and parts of the overall scene.
What do these compositions suggest to you? Perhaps they are asteroids racing through the cosmos or the Aurora Borealis shinning in the heavens of another world? It is all up to your imagination to complete the communication process.
Related posts:
https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/abstract-from-a-land-of-landscapes/
https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/challenge-your-photographic-vision/
https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/water-the-meditation-of-liquid-music/
https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/fear-and-persistance-of-expression/
https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/sense-what-the-landscape-is-telling-you/
Photographs used in this post are copyrighted by Wayne Scherr,
Range of Vision Photography, 2012, All Rights Reserved. Reproduction in any
manner is prohibited without the written permission of Wayne Scherr, Range of
Vision Photography. My image catalog can be viewed at http://www.rangeofvisionphotos.com.
You can contact me through this blog or email at: wayne@rangeofvisionphotos.com

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I cherish concentrated moments in time with no distractions of busy thoughts and mind ramblings. It is what I look for each time I pick up my camera and go on the hunt for something new to record.

abstract photograph red dunes

Red Dunes - Limited Edition Print

Having recently viewed an online website gallery looking for new and different directions to pursue I found a series of abstract images that offered splashes of color with little form or shape.  I couldn’t decipher what the photos content was but I was inspired to think and imagine what I could do as a result of this inspiration.

I like to try and react spontaneously to the moment at hand even if I have assembled some of the elements to be used in the photo session.  My goal is always to get lost in the creative process.

Without obsessively thinking I approached the subject knowing I wanted to construct abstract prints. A straight forward, documentary approach didn’t work for my vision. Depicting an abstract scene is done by using key elements to develop a visual appeal. It is not about rules or established concepts. It is about how you perceive the subject and interpret the elements before you.

Blueshift - Limited Edition Print

Blueshift - Limited Edition Print

I believe abstracts should challenge the viewer and draw them into the image so they can use their experiences to engage, challenge and excite them. That is the communication process, viewer involvement.

My key element was static color without any real shape or form. I like implied motion and movement and I thought this would give some shape and form to the subject. Using a panning and slow shutter combination technique I achieved the texture and form I was after.

What were these images of? Where they sand dunes at sunset? Highlights reflected in a pond? Where they foreign skies from a distant planet? I want the viewer to decide for themselves. What is it that you see in this form of artistic expression? Let me know what you think.

Curvature - Limited Edition Print

Curvature - Limited Edition Print

Related Posts:

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/abstract-from-a-land-of-landscapes/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/challenge-your-photographic-vision/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/water-the-meditation-of-liquid-music/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/fear-and-persistance-of-expression/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/sense-what-the-landscape-is-telling-you/

Photographs used in this post are copyrighted by Wayne Scherr,
Range of Vision Photography, 2012, All Rights Reserved. Reproduction in any
manner is prohibited without the written permission of Wayne Scherr, Range of
Vision Photography. My image catalog can be viewed at http://www.rangeofvisionphotos.com.

You can contact me through this blog or email at: wayne@rangeofvisionphotos.com

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Outside it was minus 5 degrees with crystal clear skies and a feathery frost forming on my windowpane. It stopped snowing during the night but there was still enough moisture in the air to freeze and form tiny crystal patterns.

I had been checking this window for frost almost every morning throughout the winter. Most of the time there’s nothing interesting.  There were usually just small streaks of grey granular frost with no real graphic pattern or distinctive texture.

Frostscape

Frostscape 12x12

But, once in awhile the elements seem to line up and it’s a race to capture the scene before it melts away with the warmth of the direct light of sunrise. Crystalline frost is formed directly from the water vapor in the air.  As the vapor runs along the contours of the glass it goes right from being a gas to a frozen solid, without transforming from a liquid state first. These are the intriguing textures and designs that can be worked into surreal compositions.

I quickly set up my camera and used only ambient outside light to backlight the delicate structure of the hoar frost. I wanted to hold the viewer’s attention within the frame of composition so I focused just on the crystal formations looking for patterns.

Using a shallow depth of field gave me the separation I wanted to keep the distracting vertical lines of a backyard shed out of the background.

Frost Pattern

Frost Pattern 11x17

I had about ten minutes to check out several compositions and prepare visually before the light would begin to melt the intricate designs.  It was some of the most delicate hoar frost I’ve seen. In this image I liked how the crystals have just caught the first light of day creating dimension and texture within the scene.

The sparkle within the ice crystals changed quickly and within seconds all the little lines dividing the dynamic crystal structures filled in and pooled and like an ancestry tree forked into branches before running down the glass.

All photographs used in this entry are copyrighted by Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography, 2011, All Rights Reserved. Reproduction of any kind is prohibited. If you wish reproduction rights please contact: wayne@rangeofvisionphotos.com

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Range of Vision – Discovering the Magic of the Present Moment

New Book by Wayne Scherr

Range of Vision is a photographic portfolio by Fine Art Photographer and Photojournalist Wayne Scherr.   Based in Montana, Wayne’s images presented in this book are a selection of nature photographs made in pursuit of self discovery and expression.

The Still Point is at the heart of the creative process. To be “Still” or “In the Moment” means to empty your psyche from the incessant flow of thoughts and create a state of consciousness that is open and receptive to your surroundings.

The Range of Vision portrayed in this full color book conveys a meditative approach to the design elements of  implied motion and movement of falling water, creeks and streams and features garden florals and interpretive abstracts.

80 pages illustrated with 87 photographs.

Standard landscape format 10 x 8 inches (25 x 20 cm) with soft cover $37.95

To preview and purchase your copy of Range of Vision , go to

http://www.blurb.com/books/1877388

Black-eyed Susans, garden image

Black-eyed Susans

 

Web site: http://www.rangeofvisionphotos.com

Blog: www.myphotovisions.wordpress.com

Contact: wayne@rangeofvisionphotos.com

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Not being able to travel as much as I would like to seek out and photograph the big dramatic landscapes of the Rockies, I have begun focusing on more intimate scenes.

Discovering abstract patterns in nature’s details and then capturing that energy flow through the magic of light has become just as powerful and exciting for me.

In spending more garden time instead of mountain -time I’ve learned to be more observant, detailed and to move at a much slower pace. Less ground to cover and an excellent opportunity to watch the movement of light throughout the day.

You still use your vision and consciousness conceiving the image in thought and reacting to details, composition and patterns with emotion, capturing the moment. The process is just on a smaller scale.

Three new garden images are being released through my website gallery.

Bunny Tail grasses, blue forget me not flower

Summer Light

The first which is part of a series of images I am assembling on a decorative grass called Bunny Tails. This photograph came together with the very last warm reflective sun light of a summer’s day.

Summer Light”, has the added touch of a single blue forget me not flower that enhances the background tying both elements together creating depth. These were the only blooming plants in my yard when I set out to make an image.

Throughout the day I walked past the foot tall Bunnies swaying in the wind waiting for the moment of inspiration to grab me. Just before dusk they signaled they were ready. I saw a new composition and exposed for four different views as the sun sank below the horizon.

Beckworth Garden”, is an 8×24 inch panorama.

flower garden panorama yellow Black eyed Susan's

Beckworth Garden Panorama

Three times a growing season this family garden is awash with the radiant colors of thousands of tulips in spring then in summer poppies are blooming everywhere. Late summers’ Black-Eye Susan’s flowers were what brought our cameras out.  We rose before dawn and on location making exposures before any direct light greeted us.

Garden flowers, yellow black eyed susan's blooming

Black eyed Susan's

With “Black Eyed Susan’s” the challenge of making a simple composition was made more difficult with the use of only a wide angle lens. With thousands of blossoms filling the viewfinder directing attention to the scene’s essence was the object.

I previewed a shallow depth of field and used that setting range to explore the semi circle view of the garden we had access to.

The subtleties of morning light and the vibrant color tone of the flowers combined to convey different emotions from the same garden view.

Changing one’s perspective in the way we would normally approach a familiar subject to photograph inspires us with new ideas and refines our studies in light and composition. It gives us new directions for our vision.

Related posts:

http;//myphotovisions.wordpress.com/water-the-meditation-of-liquid-music/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/fear-and-persistance-of-expression/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/sense-what-the-landscape-is-telling-you/

Photographs used in this post are copyrighted by Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography, 2010, All Rights Reserved. Reproduction in any manner is prohibited without the written permission of Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography. My image catalog can be viewed at http://www.rangeofvisionphotos.com. You can contact me through this blog or email at: wayne@rangeofvisionphotos.com

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Water, the essence of life, its constant movement has always drawn my attention both in my search for spirituality, a catalyst for meditation, and as a means of creative expression through fine art photography.

I find there is something extremely soothing about water. Flowing water comes alive with a vibrancy that is gripping to ones soul, sparkling and dancing in a blur of movement and light.

Fluid water movement

Fluid - 11x17 Giclee watercolor print

Just as water has a lot of physical benefits to the body, it also has a lot of mental benefits when utilized in meditation.  Ever wonder why a person feels refreshed while standing near the ocean, a waterfall or a stream?

Besides how calming the sound of flowing water is, water produces negative ions. When near a cascading waterfall or stream these negative ions get absorbed into the bloodstream and we feel both calm and invigorated.

Feeling its peacefulness is what I want my images to portray.  I want viewers to close their eyes and take long deep breaths and feel refreshed. I want them to imagine the sounds that emanate from a flowing creek and trigger a sense of serenity into their subconscious.

Unlike my work in photojournalism, fine art photography, for me, is all about the pure pleasure of creating the image.

Custom giclee print, water movement, implied motion

Liquidity - 11x17 Giclee print

My approach is to interpret the mood of the waterfall, river or creek before I photograph it. A fast shutter speed freezes the movement and in a sense documents the action. Using a slower shutter speed begins to transform the mood with a more mystical feeling.

Those long multi second exposures present a scene with a silky flow and a more dreamlike sensation. Illustrating the point of view of what water meditation can convey to the psyche is part of the creative process in capturing the image.

Sometimes enhancing the color saturation of the rocks that lie under the water may best define your vision. Capturing bright specular highlights is another way to convey your feelings to the viewer. It is a personal matter of interpretation and creative vision.

Proper print display culminates your invitation to extend your private experience and share it with others. Water meditation exemplified through Giclee prints on watercolor paper can invoke calm, soothing feelings both for the mind and body. They can help bring about a feeling of well being while washing away stress. It is the whirl of the moment caught in an image that draws attention and captivates the viewer developing a meditative state.

Related posts:

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/fear-and-persistance-of-expression/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/sense-what-the-landscape-is-telling-you/

Photographs used in this post are copyrighted by Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography, 2010, All Rights Reserved. Reproduction in any manner is prohibited without the written permission of Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography. My image catalog can be viewed at http://www.rangeofvisionphotos.com. You can contact me through this blog or email at: wayne@rangeofvisionphotos.com

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There are times when I don’t seem to have, “the vision”, anymore and with this comes the depression that can plague you and drag you down with disbelief in your work and in yourself.

I have photographic skills. I’ve learned the trade with a degree in photojournalism, working for newspapers, freelancing to magazines and various book publishers. I learned enough to have expressed those skills through teaching photography at a University and since that time I gathered those proficiencies and had a twenty year run with my own publishing company.

floral color pallet abstract nature giclee print

Color Pallet - 11x17 Giclee Print

But just as the day I was mesmerized by the click of a shutter on my first camera many years ago, the excitement is sometimes followed by the anxiety and self judgment of myself and the success of the image.

Sometimes, I feel that I am just playing with the, “wanna be”, thoughts of being a photographer, even though I have been driven’ to the viewfinder almost all my life.

Now my work in fine art photography is more conceptualized, sometimes only seconds before it happens but it can flow freely.

I have learned that it is the process of making images that counts. It is what shapes us as artists. What happens with the final image is only important to the viewer. Our art is made through our private vision and the execution that gathered all the elements necessary to communicate this vision to another person.

abstract photograph garden gate

Garden Gate - 11x17 Giclee Print

I still get the anxiety rushes sometimes but I have learned to accept myself and in doing so my vision and art has grown.

The creation of images is always at work in one’s subconscious. We feed it through the action of doing. Reading, viewing other artwork, studying, adopting and applying what you like and works for you leads to your distinctive style. The work itself develops who we are.

I have taken and at times created tens of thousands of images over the years. Many others were thrown in the trash seconds after I saw the developed film or deleted after capture. Each of those images was an expression of who I was at that time.

floral abstract fine art photograph

Dreaming Bamboo - 11x17 Giclee Print

Unhappy times created mediocre photographs. Depressive times left me without expression. Eventually the desire to communicate lured me back and after each personal pitfall the quality of my art grew and the vision was easier to grasp the next time around.

My point here is that one must keep working developing new image after new image, trying one thing after another with a belief that a breakthrough will come. Believing in yourself is key yet it is the hardest hurdle to overcome in the making of one’s art and the discovery of who you are.

Sometimes it will take a hundred or more failed photos to pull yourself through but faith that the next plateau is out there and you can get to it will make you art soar.

It is not an easy task but to some the drive just will not let go.

Related post:

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/sense-what-the-landscape-is-telling-you/

Photographs used in this post are copyrighted by Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography, 2010, All Rights Reserved. Reproduction in any manner is prohibited without the written permission of Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography. My image catalog can be viewed at http://www.rangeofvisionphotos.com. You can contact me through this blog or email at: wayne@rangeofvisionphotos.com

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As a follow up to my last post,” Vision and Experimentation Creates Expression”, I wanted to make note of another photo session in an effort to push my thoughts on what makes a Fine Art Photography print and how to expand my interpretation of landscape images.

Driving back from Missoula to Bozeman, Montana last weekend I took a detour and drove the Pintler Scenic Route, MT Hwy 1. Through the Sapphire Mountains and along Georgetown Lake’s cobalt blue waters where the views were mostly pine forest and snow capped peaks.

I had photographed the area many times before when I was the publisher of a regional travel guide some years back.  It was the familiarity of the scene that was a problem for me. I didn’t want the same style landscape I already had in my stock files.

aspen grove abstract landscape image

Aspen Grove Abstract Giclee Print

In making a change from a photojournalist to fine art photographer I am always trying to leave behind a documentary style of communication to a more interpretive and personal one. I am always asking what if?

Among the tens of thousands of pine trees I found a small grove of aspens dressed in bright spring green color.  I have more than a dozen aspen grove images in all seasons. What could I do that would be different this time?

Walking along the road I felt the sense of movement of the aspens in my vision. How could I capture this feeling and compose it in the viewfinder?

Setting up my tripod I began panning across the trees. With a slow shutter speed of ¼ second I exposed a shot.  It just wasn’t the right motion.

I stood there and stared at the white bark surrounded by fluttering green leaves. Then the image came. A vertical pan or tilt with the same shutter speed.

It captured the mood I felt and it was visually different from my stock landscapes of aspens.

Experimenting, trying something a bit unorthodox is always a good thing. It doesn’t matter if the results work or not as an image that communicates. The point is that you try something different to make changes in your vision.

Expand awareness of your surroundings be in the moment and the images will reach out to you as connections are made.

Related Posts:

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2010/06/10/vision-and-experimentation-creates-expression/

 https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2010/03/22/twenty-minute-challenge-photograph-an-orchid/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2010/02/21/use-red-accent-photographs-to-capture-attention/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2010/1/12/what-can-orange-do-for-you?/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/11/17/purple-an-element-of-fire/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/09/11/can-color-photgraphs-enhance-positive-feelings-of-well-being?/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/09/28/photography-and-feng-shui-for-interior-design/

Photographs used in this post are copyrighted by Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography, 2010, All Rights Reserved. Reproduction in any manner is prohibited without the written permission of Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography. My image catalog can be viewed at http://www.rangeofvisionphotos.com. You can contact me through this blog or email at: wayne@rangeofvisionphotos.com

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I was looking down working on a set of ice pond abstracts trying to figure out how to approach this subject with my camera. I was up early, the morning light was good and it wasn’t very cold.  I searched for the design and compositional elements featuring close up conceptual images to come to me.

Nothing here, nothing there, I kept on walking around a five acre puddle laden parking lot. Head down, I scanned a dozen sheets of thin cracked ice. I felt frustrated. There had to be something worthwhile here.

nature abstract pond ice

Pond Ice 2 - 11x17 Giclee Print

Where was that Zen moment I needed? I know from experience if I am open, images will show themselves and allow my camera to capture their essence. Don’t rush this I thought. Breathe. Enjoy the space. The day is good.

I changed to a macro lens and did another turn around the lot looking deeper. Finally, some air bubbles beneath a delicate slip of ice caught my eye and while down on my knees I made a few exposures. A glance to the left and more possibilities appeared. Circles and lines with slight gradients of grey blue color began to stand out.

OK, this is better I thought. Keep up the observation.

Suddenly a piercing cry from the sky drew my attention. Looking up I saw two bald eagles. www.birdweb.org . They danced in the bright blue Montana sky playing tag on the wind. Circling each other, one flipped over and they locked talons, free falling several feet before they leveled off and continued their course south toward the Spanish Peaks and the Madison mountain range across the valley.

Nature abstract pond ice

Pond Ice 6 - 11x17 Giclee Print

I stood with an adrenalin rush awed by the wild sight I had just witnessed. I felt humbled by the rare event. It had me mesmerized with a broad grin until they flew off in the distance their white heads and tails disappearing, blending into the snowcapped peaks on the horizon.

What an honor!

These few momentous seconds gave me my nature connection. In an instant I felt centered. The spirits had touched me.

Returning to my down to earth visual task of pond ice photographs the invigorating experience refocused my awareness. New images began to flow. Now, those air bubble circles, icy streaks and muddy textures joined in my viewfinder all on their own. I became the conduit that tripped the shutter.

nature abstract pond ice

Pond Ice 5 - 11x17 Giclee Print

A successful morning effort added several new images to my nature abstract collection. I left the parking lot feeling high.

Two days later I was contacted by an online gallery with an invitation to join their selective artist’s family, www.discoveredartists.com.  They reviewed work from my web site and asked me to submit nature abstracts to market and feature on their site. My reward was complete.

The positive effects of being open and making an effort to pursue my art continues to drive my creativity and strengthen my beliefs.

Related posts of interest:

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2010/02/07/winter-hunt-on-peach-street/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/12/10/final-fall-visuals-to-keep-the-focus-on-creative-photography/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/11/11/no-fall-color-only-seed-pods-to-photograph/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/08/27/seeing-with-a-beginners-mind/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/08/20/water-speaking-water/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/07/19/winter-windows/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/02/02/river-shaman/

Photographs used in this post are copyrighted by Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography, 2010, All Rights Reserved. Reproduction in any manner is prohibited without the written permission of Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography. My image catalog can be viewed at http://www.rangeofvisionphotos.com. You can contact me through this blog or through email at: wayne@rangeofvisionphotos.com

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A heavy mist rolled over the Ko’olau Mountains bordering the backside of the Valley of the Temples on Oahu.  Crossing the long wooden footbridge from the parking area takes you into an Asian world surrounding the Byodo- In Temple.

Hawaii's Byodo-In Temple

Byodo-In Temple on Oahu

The setting is exotic with a Zen styled garden, ponds and a replica of the 950-year old Byodoin Temple that is located in Japan near Kyoto. www.byodo-in.com

Visually striking this Temple was built almost 40 years ago to commemorate the 100th anniversary of Japanese immigrant workers who came to work in the sugar plantation fields of Hawaii.

They merged with other cultures notably the Chinese, Filipino, Portuguese, Korean, and native Hawaiians, all who toiled in the sugar plantations throughout the mid 1800’s. www.hawaiiweb.com

A three-ton “Peace Bell” was being rung and you could hear it echoing off the sharp jagged pali’s, (cliffs), that nestle the Temple grounds. Ringing the five-foot brass bell is said to purify your mind and release bad spirits bringing you happiness and long life.

Temple Bishop

Peace Bell and Temple Bishop

This seems a bit ironic since the Temple and gardens are part of a cemetery complex. However the location is a great place to seek privacy, meditate and search for inner peace.

We rang the bell and met the Temple Bishop who told us about the history and architecture of the site while he somehow called in sparrows from the surrounding hibiscus bushes and waddle trees and had them eat cookies from his hands.

He instructed us on how to have the birds come to us but they flew directly to him instead. The calming peace he exuded made you want to stay and study meditation from him. For a few moments it was like being in the presence of Zen Masters Thich Nhat Hanh, (Plum Village) www.plumvillage.org or John Daido Loori, www.johndaidoloori.org.

A Meditation Pavilion and koi pond lie at the foot of the Temple building. It is a good place to stop and take in the beautiful atmosphere of the Japanese gardens. Schools of colorful five pound koi patrol the shallow waters of the two acre pond. Their vibrant gold and red colors reflect Hawaii’s tropical light like shinny metal.

Koi Pond at Byodo-In Temple

Koi at Byodo-In Temple

Up at the Hoodo or Hall of the Chinese Phoenix is the nine-foot Amida or “Lotus” Buddha. It is named “lotus” because the Buddha statue sits upon a lotus flower. This nine foot sculpture is the largest wooden Buddha carved in over 900 years. It was stained in black lacquer paint and then hand decorated in gold leaf.

Respectfully moving your shoes before entering the sanctuary and lighting incense sticks you feel you are in a truly sacred place regardless of one’s religious preferences.

The best time for photography is in the morning because the towering cliffs cast deep dark shadows from the west onto the grounds mid to late afternoon. Much of the structure detail and color saturation is lost.

This out of the way side excursion is truly a fascinating experience and photographic opportunity that no one should miss while visiting Oahu.

Related Posts:
http://www.myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/06/14/waipo’o-falls-one-of-kauai’s-best-hikes
https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/05/31/lost-valleys-and-the-wettest-spot-on-earth
https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/02/14/napali-coast
https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/02/21/house-of-the-sun

Photographs used in this post are copyrighted by Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography, 2010, All Rights Reserved. Reproduction in any manner is prohibited without the written permission of Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography. My image catalog can be viewed at http://www.rangeofvisionphotos.com. You can contact me through this blog or through email at: wayne@rangeofvisionphotos.com

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Even though the winter season has just begun, it seems cold weather has held me captive in my home for days.  I didn’t realize how long it had been since I took the time to get out into the mountains. Seeing as it was the first of the year, I felt it was time to process the activities of the past months and try to gain some perspective.

As with most creative people there are spells of inactivity mixed with procrastination and a lull in motivation levels.  I am a photojournalist and fine art nature photographer. When life runs smooth I go through the elation of being in the moment with my work. A bad day has me feeling depressed for letting my conscious voice get the best of me.

At times we are centered in a down flow of a creative energy wave that can be costly to your personal life. It can interfere with business distracting you from your expressive goals as an artist. It can build walls and lead relationships away from your desired objective as with family.

Not everyone in the world understands how the torment of one’s own negative thoughts or how someone else’s simple actions can strike like bolts of lightning and can disable your creative spirit for long periods of time. Things happen.

The energies that define creativity are fragile. They can lift you high or slap you silly. When we are stripped down to basics, if necessary, we start again to rediscover who we really are and why we do what we do.

For some people their art is the, “only”,  aspiration they can see. It’s like a set of blinders that directs your life no matter the cost.

Winter Gallatin River

Winter frost Gallatin River

So with all these enchanting thoughts rolling around my head I drove up Gallatin Canyon towards Big Sky this morning. Snow coverage is light to moderate so far this winter with only a twelve inch base built up on the river banks.  At first light it was just plain cold, five below. With the humidity at the river I felt a few shivers up my spine.

Days like this, when I seek renewal, I find comfort in being outdoors. Fresh air and a bit of vitamin D from sunshine is enough to regain some confidence in spirit and nurture a few creative thoughts.

A light wind kept hoar frost from building up on most trees except for a fifty yard swathe near the mouth of the canyon.  Pines on the east side of the river bank were draped in the purity of white with blue sky and river reflections.

No cars or trucks. No birds singing, only a pair of Bald Eagles that nest nearby watched curiously in silence as I labored through the snow. Once, I stood at the water’s edge, I could hear the river speak in muffled tones as small ice flows crashed into boulders and burst into tiny fragments dissolving into the continuous flow.  It was a welcoming metaphor, a peaceful, eternal greeting.

A minute of breathing deep and feeling centered, my thoughts expand and fuse with the stream’s currant. Together, in concert with the river, I extended my reach to grab a slippery rock. It is an alluring vision of a real Photographer’s, (Artist’s), life.  

Somehow, the visual mix of free flowing water and its’ song rushing on the rocks is what I needed to fuel anticipation again and get prepared.

Related Posts:
https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/11/15/would-you-get-up-early-to-photograph-this/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/11/11/no-fall-color-only-seed-pods-to-photograph/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/12/10/final-fall-visuals-to-keep-the-focus-on-creative-photography/

Photographs used in this post are copyrighted by Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography, 2010, All Rights Reserved. Reproduction in any manner is prohibited without the written permission of Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography. My image catalog can be viewed at http://www.rangeofvisionphotos.com. You can contact me through this blog or email at: wayne@rangeofvisionphotos.com

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Today, wind has gathered grey clouds with a minus 24 degree temperature.  Silenced by a deep winter blanket of snow Bozeman is quiet today, just after a week of sun and above normal temps. A new season has made its’ transition.

With no large fall landscapes to photograph this year because of an early freeze in October, I had to be content to work on close ups and search for compatible light in my backyard garden last week.

Autumn leaf

Autumn Leaf - Digital Print

Living in the mountains I like the grand vistas of autumn with colorful aspen, maple and cottonwood trees. It is easy to bypass the individual or smaller splash of color. The garden was stark and matted down with only a few leaves hanging on twisted branches.

Twigs rubbing on a wooden shed caught my attention.  A handful of leaves clung to the shrub. Backlit they stood out from the grey weathered shed. It gave me possibilities.

Using macro focus and a very shallow depth of field I isolated a single leaf, blurred the background and utilized the stem, twig and limb structure of the shrub to draw the viewer further into the image. My composition was clean and simple, offsetting the leaf and getting the plane of focus accurate enough to give the setup a three dimensional feel.

Hanging hollyhock leaves

Hanging Hollyhock Leaves - Digital Print

A series of images produced both back and front lit leaves incorporating small branches with an almost bonsai structure setting.

Autumn Leaf 6

Autumn Leaf 6 - Digital Print

The south side of the garden produced a different scenario. A withered Hollyhock with a string of leaves hung from a downed stalk, only inches from the ground. I thought the background was busy however I really liked the colors of border rocks and blue shadow playing on the ground behind the dead leaves. I stayed with the shallow depth of field and used my macro focus on a 200mm lens compressed the image and isolated the subject.

The shrunken leaves reminded me of mice hanging by their tails. I laughed.  Good light was essential to the success of the image. It gave me crisp detail and subtle color that created a late moody autumn shot.

A final arrangement consisted of wrinkled Hollyhock blossoms with only a touch of deep wine red in the gnarled petals. Seed pods formed a bug eyed Preying Mathis in my minds’ eye so I recomposed to depict the essence of the bug structure with an illuminated background.

Bug Bud

Bug Bud - Withered Hollyhocks

Guess, I will call it a whimsical abstract.  Look hard you may see it too.

This weekend having to bare the winter chill I’ll get out there again with camera in hand.  Colors are more monochromatic and compositional lines both sensually soft and with deep shadows, very graphic.

There is no ideal time of day or season to go outdoors and have some fun finding the flow of energies that gather before your lens. It is the visual exercise and the process that counts. You need to stay creative no matter what.

Related Posts:
https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/11/15/would-you-get-up-early-to-photograph-this/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/11/11/no-fall-color-only-seed-pods-to-photograph/

Photographs used in this post are copyrighted by Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography, 2009, All Rights Reserved. Reproduction in any manner is prohibited without the written permission of Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography. My image catalog can be viewed at http://www.rangeofvisionphotos.com. You can contact me through this blog or through email at: wayne@rangeofvisionphotos.com

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Our canoes slipped silently through the chilly waters of the Madison River. A few geese honked overhead and ducks splashed along the shoreline seeking safety in the reeds and overhangs.

The ceaseless current guided our crafts past eroded sandstone and mud packed banks, on this stretch of the river it carved them into endless shapes.

Autumn canoeing on the Madison River

Madison River near Three Forks, Montana

I couldn’t help but fantasize about Lewis and Clark and the Native Americans who also floated and crossed this scenic river in the not so distant past. Not a lot has changed since those canoes pasted this way. The cottonwood trees that bore witness are still standing tall near the water’s edge.

If you read the 1805 journals of the Lewis and Clark Expedition, http://www.lewisandclarktrail.com, then you know where to find their campsites and place yourself in their footsteps building campfires and setting up their tents. History is all around.

The damp scents of the river and sweet cottonwoods invigorate my senses. It is easy to stay alert, watching for game, or picturing a Hidatsa Indian party riding up on the ridges, looking for Sacagawea. Her kidnapping was the beginning of a venture that led her into the annals of history in the American West and relocated her far from her homeland.

aerial Missouri Headwaters State Park

Missouri Headwaters State Park, Montana

We drifted on the river’s flow past Three Forks, Montana, www.threeforskmontana.com, and on toward the Missouri River Headwater’s State Park. Headwaters, or as most of those who live here, just call it “Three Forks”, is the geographic confluence of the Madison, Jefferson and Gallatin Rivers and forms the headwaters of the Missouri, the longest river in the  U.S.

Each river has its own course flow and visual landscape. Friends and I have had many adventures, seeing the sights, on these clear water tributary trips. Deer, Moose Eagles, Heron and, of course, rattlesnakes are all out there.

Each season different animals appear, just like the transition of wildflowers from Sagebrush Buttercups to Queen Ann’s Lace or the brilliant color change from early green spring willow buds to bright yellow autumn leaves. All you have to do is pay attention.

And these graceful rivers will grab your attention!

Contact Information: Missouri Headwaters, Region 3 FWP Office, 1400 S. 19th St. Bozeman, MT  59715 or call (406) 994-4042.

For Further Information:

Bozeman Chamber of Commerce – http://www.bozemannet.com

Information on the Lewis and Clark Trail – http://lewisandclark.state.mt.us/discovery.shtm

Montana Department of Commerce – http://www.travelmt.com

 

Photographs used in this post are copyrighted by Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography, 2009, All Rights Reserved. Reproduction in any manner is prohibited without the written permission of Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography. My image catalog can be viewed at http://www.rangeofvisionphotos.com. You can contact me through this blog or through email at: wayne@rangeofvisionphotos.com 

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The Grand Teton and eight other peaks stand at over 12,000 feet with the Grand at 13,770 ft. the tallest in the range. Autumn is my favorite time to visit this National Park in Wyoming.  www.grand.teton.national-park.com . It doesn’t matter which side of these mountains you are on, the colors are magnificent.

Yellow and gold Quaking Aspens plus the splashes of red maples and green pine seem to be as dominant in the landscape as the snow capped peaks and the curve of the Snake River that carves the valley floor.

Fall Landscape Teton National Forest  Idaho

Teton Range Idaho 11x17 print

With only two roads bisecting the Park unless you hike one of the 200 miles of trails for a different view your fall images can have a tendency to look similar to other photographers all searching for their own point of interest. But with that in mind you have some alternative choices that can give your photos a slightly different take. www.fs.fed.us/btnf/

This glaciated landscape is vast with no foothills just the jagged mountain mass jutting up from the valley floor. Tuning into the heart of the Yellowstone ecosystem one can’t help but be open to the Native American travel lanes and the mountain men who explored this wilderness just two hundred years ago. Knowing a little history and geology of the location you travel to opens your psyche to more photographic possibilities.

The Tetons were named by French fur trappers who when on the Idaho side of the range thought several peaks resembled women’s breasts. Guess they were on the trail a long time. A long list of historic figures explored these U-shaped valleys and alpine topography.

Grand Teton National Park Wyoming 11x17 print

Autumn Teton National Park 11x17 print

Jackson Hole community, (www.jacksonholewy.net), was named after a fur trapper, David Jackson, who would “hole-up” in this location in the late 1820’s. John Colter a member of the famous Lewis and Clark Expedition was the first non-native American to experience the grand spectacle of the Tetons in 1805.

You can’t help but photograph the grand vistas. This Park is perfect for wide angle images. Because the Tetons run north – south morning light gets flat fast so you have to be aware of parting clouds and other weather phenomenon that can enhance the scene.  You have to be disciplined to get up early and be on location to record those miraculous moments when it is all about the warm glow light.

Fall Teton National Forest

Fall Landscape Tetons 11x17 print

To travel means you are a tourist and of course it is OK to compose and record the common scenes that everyone photographs. But do not stop there. Squat, climb or perhaps choose a strong foreground or the vanishing point perspective of a river or creek to put your own slant on things.

Use all the lenses in your arsenal to interpret what presents itself to your view and try various exposures that can improve texture and color. Sometimes it can be a simple polarizing lens that amplifies the intensity of the endless blue sky and white cirrus clouds that peaks your interest. Experiment, search and interpret your experience this Rocky Mountain destination. www.nps.gov/grte

Related posts:

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/11/11/no-fall-color-only-seed- pods-to-photograph/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/02/28/lee-metcalf-wilderness/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/03/14/absaroka-beartooth-wilderness/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/03/28/yellowstone-national-park/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/05/02/crown-of-the-continent-glacier-national-park-montana/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/06/28/the-pristine-thorofare-a-yellowstone-experience/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/05/08/salty-legs-and-mountain-goats/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/09/05/track-of-the-grizzly-bear/

Photographs used in this post are copyrighted by Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography, 2009, All Rights Reserved. Reproduction in any manner is prohibited without the written permission of Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography. My image catalog can be viewed at http://www.rangeofvisionphotos.com. You can contact me through this blog or through email at: wayne@rangeofvisionphotos.com

 

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Feng Shui is an ancient Chinese practice and system of aesthetics that utilizes chi or Qi, energy, from both heaven and earth to improve life by receiving and directing this energy into your lifestyle including your home and office environment.

This aesthetics system is made up of five elements: earth, fire, metal, wood and water. These elements dominate your environment and since we live in a colorful world different colors are an expression of each component.

Japanese Garden

Japanese Garden

Color and item placement gives us a sense of harmony and balance. We can open our lives to positive energy by displaying Feng Shui colors related to the elements in our living and work space.

Combined with photographic images, Feng Shui broadens this spectrum of harmony and balance with a greater sensory appeal. Inspirational nature photography specifically brings outdoor grandeur indoors with splashes of positive energy.

According to Fen Shui practice there are two types of energy, yin and yang. Yin energy is passive and promotes a calm relaxing environment. Yang is a more agitated source of non-passive energy.

Waterfall Energy Flow - Giclee Print

Waterfall Energy Flow - Giclee Print

Yin colors are black, blue, white, pink, purple and green.

Yang colors are orange, maroon, red brown, yellow, tan, beige, mauve and gold.

What do color elements mean?

Fire color elements: Colors associated with the element of fire are of course red, then orange, yellow, purple, pink and violet.

Pink is the color of healing. It is associated with deep feelings of self-respect and a personal sense of self-awareness.

Sunburst Dahlia Panorama Giclee Print

Sunburst Dahlia Panorama Giclee Print

 Red promotes wealth and prosperity. A most active color it is associated with fame, happiness, love and relationships. Red generates strength within an individual. Too much of this stimulating color encourages aggression, fear and anger. Think of this balance when using red in wall décor presentation.

Another yang color is orange and can be used to strengthen creativity and concentration. It is a positive color that promotes enthusiasm and ambition. Too much leads to restlessness and nervousness.

Purple Irises - Giclee Print

Purple Irises - Giclee Print

 

Purple supports mental and physical healing. It is a calming color and is associated with spiritual awareness, dignity and wisdom.

A more soothing color of a spiritual nature is violet. It has a soothing nature and can help calm symptoms of mental illness and hunger. Too much of this color advances prejudice and a sense of snobbery.

 A color associated with insight, creativity, joy and wisdom is yellow. This bright color can help lift you mood and enhance a feeling of well being.

Earth Element Colors

Pale earth tones are unifying and can be used anywhere.

Metal Element Colors

Colors that are associated with metal are white, silver, gold and grey. Gold is associated with wealth, wisdom and prosperity. It encourages good health and success. Grey stabilizes and has a calming effect because it is neutral. 

White Cup and Saucer - Giclee Print

White Cup and Saucer - Giclee Print

White promotes creativity, love and relationships. It is associated with travel, purity and confidence. Used with gold and silver it generates calmness. Since white blends with all colors it promotes harmony and purity. Too much white gives an unfriendly feeling.

Water Element Colors

Black and blue are associated with the element of water. Black is associated with knowledge, life paths and skills. Used with metals it promotes money. It is the color of power and emotional protection. 

The yin color of energy is blue. Blue is calm and soothing. It reflects love and aids in bringing about healing and relaxation. Blue promotes feelings of trust and peace. Blue is linked with adventure and travel exploration.

Aspen Grove - Giclee Print

Aspen Grove - Giclee Print

Wood Element Colors

Allied with the element of wood are the colors of green and brown. Brown is linked with security and safety.

 Green is a restful color that supports balance, relief of pain and healing. Too much green can lead to depression, selfishness and jealousy.

So in theory the stronger the color the less you need to achieve what your intent is. Colors are used to attain specific energy levels, to enhance and to maintain. Large areas should be pale with smaller surfaces reserved for accent colors. If you do not like a certain color do not use it with your décor. Personal preferences are just as important in realizing your desired decorating purposes.

Buddha Statue - Giclee Print

Buddha Statue - Giclee Print

I have used photographic images of nature to illustrate color meanings involved with Feng Shui. Incorporating nature indoors helps create a comfortable ambience in your home, the work place, health care facilities, conference rooms and public spaces in general.

All photographs used in this entry are copyrighted by Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography, All Rights Reserved 2009. Reproduction or use of any kind is prohibited without the written permission of Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography. Gallery  images can be viewed at www.rangeofvisionphotos.com.  Contact: wayne@rangeofvisionphotos.com.

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I was packing up my gear getting ready to travel home.

All morning we photographed garden flowers in my brother’s yard. Forget-me-nots were lush. This year they overflowed from each of his five raised sections of plant life. Blue, bluer and faint purple, like a carpet, they filled even the pathways glowing and saturated in recognition of the warm spring day.

Forget-me-nots - Giclee watercolor print

Forget-me-nots - Giclee watercolor print

We could not have ordered up a better day.

Excited by the flower growth and choice light we scrambled with our gear not wanting to lose the chance to record something great. We recognized the rush simultaneously. “I think we’re supposed to breathe.” I said.

“I am breathing,” was the faint response. We laughed taking a moment to become centered and aware of the situation.

It is easy to always shoot the same type of image. It is like imitating yourself as you try to make an artful composition where all the elements come together before your lens. But what we really want is not to have a preconceived idea of what to look for. It seems the trick is just to be aware of the circumstances and respond with heightened senses to what presents itself before your camera.

Red Poppy - Giclee watercolor print

Red Poppy - Giclee watercolor print

I don’t know of another way to avoid the standard clichés of flower photography.

We waded through the garden watching the light run over the thick undergrowth giving shadowy edges to each leaf and blossom. Every shade of blue was present in the gleaming forget-me-nots. You did not know where to place your focus our subject was almost too busy with thousands of tiny blossoms each calling to our attention.

It was the iris’ leafy blades that set the direction. Sharp, flat and a constant green brought dimension to these mini landscapes. They offset the texture and color of the floral bouquet with flat triangles, ribbons and wedges.

It was funny we each had different lenses but interacted with the moment and the light in the same manner. We worked the situation, refined the composition, sharpened the focus and sometimes moved on without tripping the shutter. Close up, medium and close up again shutters opened and closed. We could sense our smiles without looking at each other.

Patience ruled the shoot.

Fire Tulips - Giclee watercolor 8x24 panorama

Fire Tulips - Giclee watercolor 8x24 panorama

Brilliant red orange fire tulips were explosive with color like hot iron, radiant, in a blacksmith’s hearth. Yellow red tulips the size of baseballs edged with backlight were inspirational against a weathered grey fence. One lone yellow Westpoint Tulip constantly trembled in the slight breeze always wobbling on its fifteen inch stem.

All of this color and variety gave way to the luminous white and soft peddled plum blossoms just above our heads. We had kept our view down and actually backed into a low lying branch before recognizing another viable composition.

Two hours later, time had absorbed our senses and claimed about a hundred new images. The warm sunlight became harsh and midday winds picked up. We felt exhausted from our concentrated efforts.

Bleeding Hearts - Giclee watercolor print

Bleeding Hearts - Giclee watercolor print

The rest of the day moved on in a less creative mode and as things began to wind down before I had to leave for home we took another turn in the garden talking about the late afternoon light. Shadows had shifted and those colors and edges popped again.

I had to unpack my gear. It was like a whole new encounter. Same subject different views and a more refined approach to composition raised that level of joy and satisfaction all over again.Being open, staying for the light, resulted in a new 8×24 inch Giclee panorama of those glowing Fire Tulips, backlit, dramatic and a peaceful end to the day.

All in all I figured it was well worth the three hour drive back home in the crisp night mountain air with my moon roof open counting the stars dreaming without thought.

All images are copyrighted by Wayne Scherr, 2009, All Rights Reserved. No image may be linked to or downloaded without the written authorization of Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography. Prints and or scans are available for purchase or lease. An image catalog can be viewed on my web site at http://www.rangeofvisionphotos.com
Please contact me through email: wayne@rangeofvisionphotos.com

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I have been doing walking meditations each day, mostly out a dirt road where a spring pond attracts geese, ducks, song birds with an occasional heron or fox. Almost always I’ll see a hawk soaring above watching for gofers that scurry from hole to hole.

But today I was in town doing laundry, not a real fun thing to do on beautiful Saturdays. Morning light was soft and the Rocky Mountain air very fresh and incredibly clear. I followed a walkway up into a grove of aspen and cottonwood trees all paved and park-like.

Several flower gardens were waking, catching those early morning rays of sunlight. 

With walking meditations the idea is to plant your steps so that your feet massage the earth and your breath is timed, breathing in at the count of two, exhaling on the count of two, very rhythmic and mindful. It is most important to be mindful of your breathing. It forces you to be centered in the here and now moment.

3 Bunny Tails - 11x17 Giclee Print

3 Bunny Tails - 11x17 Giclee Print

Two Downey woodpeckers danced through the air chasing each other expressing their song of lust. They stayed a good twenty yards ahead of me flitting from tree to tree calling out. I smiled.

The narrow sidewalk wound through the trees and crossed a small rustling stream with a wooden footbridge. The aspens and cottonwood surrounded several acres of townhouses that almost blended in. It was so quiet. In the middle of town it was an oasis for song birds, quaking aspens and the creek gurgling over smooth rocks and an occasional broken limb filling the air with peace.

I did my concentrated paces from one end of the complex to the other breathing from the belly, smiling from the heart.

Pink Gladiolus - 11x17 Giclee Print

Pink Gladiolus - 11x17 Giclee Print

A pair of scarlet Taningers waited for me at the exit path, as I crossed the footbridge, with their bright yellow bodies, red heads and a compelling morning song. They too chased each other from bridge to tree limb down to the creek.

I left the grove of trees and townhouses refreshed, picked up my laundry and headed home to photograph in my garden, mindful of the opportunity of a morning smile.

All images are copyrighted by Wayne Scherr, 2009, All Rights Reserved. No image may be linked to or downloaded without the written authorization of Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography. Prints and or scans are available for purchase or lease. Please contact me through email: wayne@rangeofvisionphotos.com or through my image catalog web site at http://www.rangeofvisionphotos.com
 

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Do you ever think about color and how it affects your life?

Do you ever see red or feel blue? Some people are said to turn green with envy. These are real changes that happen to our body’s aura or electro-magnetic field.  Studies show that color and its use can alter our emotions.

So what is color?

An easy definition is just the quality of light.

But with sunny days or cloudy days the quality of light changes and has many variations.  Light waves or vibrations are constantly moving. Even though we do not notice most of the time light rays are always dancing in and around everything.

Flower Flair - Giclee Print

Flower Flair - Giclee Print

Many people believe that color is life and that color is an expression of the divine.

Ancient civilizations studied the power and influence of color. They used color in their healing and religious practices. Think of the saturated hues used in temples and palaces.

High priests and priestesses from China, India and Egypt developed the science of color based upon the nature of man and the sun’s bright spectrum of light. So these fundamental laws of cosmic energy we know as color have always been around.

Healers and shamans used principles of cosmic energy and color to heal many ailments.

We understand that disease means a lack of harmony within the body. Chromo therapy and its use, is a means of bringing balance back to the body through the use of colored light.

In the 1930’s, a scientist named Ghadiali, developed several theories about the therapeutic effects of colored light and the role it plays upon our bodies.He wrote about how color represents different chemical reactions in the high vibrations of light. Each color he stated can stimulate or inhibit how one’s system works. If you understand how different colors work on ones organs, then in theory, you can apply the right color light to balance that system or organ and then condition it.

Palm Leaf - Giclee Print

Palm Leaf - Giclee Print

If you live in a healthy state, you are conditioned or balanced with light energy.

When the balance is off you are known to be in a state of dis-ease. Restoring the balance is what color therapy is all about.

All living things get energy from the sun and its light wave vibrations. All known elements are found in the energy of the sun.

These elements and chemicals are all contained in white light. The sun emits white light energies into the atmosphere and life is then sustained or charged by it.

We have all heard about auras that surround and penetrate our bodies. They absorb white light and divide it into different color energies. With humans there are two activities working all the time. They are called catabolism and anabolism.

Anabolism builds and repairs. Catabolism eliminates waste products from the body. Good health is a balance between these two processes and is called metabolism.

The scientist Ghadiali found that the color red is a construction color. It stimulates the liver and red blood cells. Violet works on the spleen and is the color of catabolism or destruction.

So red stimulates the liver and is at one end of the color spectrum. Violet is at the other end of the visible spectrum. He found that green is the balancing or central color. This is great for the pituitary gland, which controls all the other glands, which affect the entire body.

Red, green and violet are the primary color waves used in Chromo therapy.

Purple Iris 8x24 Giclee Panorama

Purple Iris 8x24 Giclee Panorama

Why use color therapy at all when we have so many drugs and medicines? Well are the drugs natural? Is putting unnatural things into your body a good thing? Do drugs really balance out the body? Do they just work on the symptoms? With things unbalanced and we use drugs, are there then drug-induced illnesses?

People react differently to the same drugs. Many people are allergic to different ones. At least with Chromo therapy there are no harmful effects. Drugs treat symptoms while color therapy treats the imbalance itself.

It is thought that applying color treatments instead of drugs can be a constructive activity without any destructive effect.

Pushing - Salisphy Giclee Print

Pushing - Salisphy Giclee Print

Today the medical profession uses light from the spectrum just below and above visible light energies. Doctors use ultra-violet and infrared rays. Used for too long a period of time either one can cause damage to body tissue. The worst that can happen with light from the visible spectrum might be a slight accentuation of the problem in the first place.

So since there can really be no problems using Chromo therapy, don’t be afraid of it. Do a little fun research. Add a little green light into your life.

In expanding thoughts related to photography and light are there relationships with color and recorded image that can have a similar effect on the body’s imbalances?

Many health care facilities use large Giclee and photographic display prints of nature and abstract images of bold colors to help induce a sense of calm and a healing environment for their patients.

Some interior designers using Feng Shui use color photography in print and transparency formats to shape and enhance the flow of chi or positive energy in the home or office space with wall décor.

All images are copyrighted by Wayne Scherr, 2009, All Rights Reserved. No image may be linked to or downloaded without the written authorization of Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography. Prints and or scans are available for purchase or lease. Please contact me through email: wayne@rangeofvisionphotos.com or through my image catalog web site at http://www.rangeofvisionphotos.com

 

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As quick as the snapping of a pine branch just a few yards behind us, Tom yelled bear and his horse bolted after the grizzly that stepped out onto the trail. With a shot of adrenalin my horse came alive and like a rocket blasted off following Tom into the forest racing toward the dark brown blur sprinting away.

My heart pounded in my throat. Blue the appaloosa I was riding was all fearless energy. In unison we jumped a log running at full throttle. I ducked hugging Blue’s mane when a thick aspen branch took a shot at my head and remained fluid in the saddle. I was thrilled beyond belief.

Grizzly Bear

Grizzly Bear

It lasted a mere thirty seconds. The grizzly bear disappeared in the thick pine growth. We pulled up to a halt, still whooping and hollering at the bear, having chased him away from our camp area.

We were five days into a spectacular pack trip in the Monument section of the Lee Metcalf Wilderness. Tom Heintz, who owns Medicine Lake Outfitters, www.medicinelakeoutfitters.com, and a long time friend, invited me to do some exploring before the summer season began so we could get some new photos he could use for publicity.

Just the night before during a full moon I saw the silhouette of that bear appear across my tent. I sat up suddenly shaking in my sleeping bag. When he reached the door of my tent the whole side folded in and quickly popped back out. Then silence.

I don’t know how long I sat there waiting for his entry but there was nothing. The next morning after telling Tom about the almost invasion he noticed the claw marks down the rain fly of my dome tent. It was like a telling scar. Proof I was not dreaming.

It marked the importance of keeping a clean camp and respecting wilderness rules.

Monument Unit Lee Metcalf Wilderness

Monument Unit Lee Metcalf Wilderness

We continued a more calm exploration of a rocky ridge and found ourselves with an excellent view out on a precipice with three sides that plummeted several hundred feet to a valley below and figured it was a great place for lunch.

Dismounted we walked the horses to the edge reliving the excitement of the chase. Looking back toward the trail we had just came from we both realized where we were and how vulnerable the situation was if that pissed off bear returned to chase us.

We were out of there in seconds with nervous laughter in the air and another adventurous memory.

For more information on the Lee Metcalf Wilderness contact the Gallatin National Forest at 406-587-2520 or http://www.fs.fed.us/r1/gallatin/

Related Posts:
https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/02/28/lee-metcalf-wilderness
https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/03/14/absaroka-beartooth-wilderness

Photographs used in this post are copyrighted by Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography, 2009, All Rights Reserved. Reproduction in any manner is prohibited without the written permission of Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography. An image catalog can be viewed at http://www.rangeofvisionphotos.com . You can contact me through this blog or through email at: wayne@rangeofvisionphotos.com

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In photography as with all forms of art we seek oneness with our subject. This is called beginners mind. It is this part of the creative process that gratifies our souls, not necessarily the finished print. Although an excellent Giclee or digital print does make for good wall décor and can complete the visual venture.

We have all the equipment, books and videos one needs to learn from but does all the knowledge we accumulate get in the way of seeing and capturing good images?

How many times have you been in the field with a spectacular landscape scene before you? The light is excellent. But the rush of technology fills you head with thoughts of lenses, f/stops, depth of field, film choices, scene brightness ranges, composition and exposure limits. Equipment confusion really can get in the way of seeing and making art.

Water Spirits 16x24 Giclee Print

Water Spirits 16x24 Giclee Print

Some photographers get caught in this barrage of information and tools. Their images are accurate but lack life’s vibrancy. The spirit of the moment just isn’t there.

Every instant that passes before us is new and free from past baggage. Seeing with a beginners mind is the ability to step aside from personal issues and let the image find you.

For me, many of my images can come quickly. They tap me on the shoulder and seem to trip the shutter all by themselves. I become a catalyst to the event and I love that energy surge.

It takes practice to become comfortable with your equipment but it is essential.  With an ease of using your equipment you can trigger the core of your beginner’s mind.

This was something I learned as a beginning photojournalist. Don’t think about your equipment just know what it can do. Be there, be aware and the image will find you. You know, “the f/8 and be there” National Geographic thing.

Life’s moments happen fast and disappear. Practice with your equipment so when they appear before you, you can capture those flashes in time and see each moment with a beginners mind.

Photographs used in this post are copyrighted by Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography, 2009, All Rights Reserved. Reproduction in any manner is prohibited without the written permission of Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography. An image catalog can be viewed at http://www.rangeofvisionphotos.com . You can contact me through this blog or through email at: wayne@rangeofvisionphotos.com

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I had been reading about Zen and the Art of Photography and came across a statement regarding “Water Speaking Water”, by John Daido Loori a Zen Master and fellow photographer. I found these three words fascinating and thought about them on and off for three days.

In the realm of Zen everything in the universe is one. Everything is interconnected and relies on each other to complete its fulfillment. It is only our personal awareness that experiences life from our own unique point of view, defined only by the moment.

Liquid Voices

Liquid Voices

Water flows, as energy flows, around us and through us and at times if we have reached our still point we are able to capture a slice of this energy, in our hearts, on film or render it digitally.

My brother and I hiked to a small gorge near Big Sky, Montana, in the Gallatin National Forest, to a waterfall, on a photographic outing. It was just the day before when we had dropped down from the high country in the Absaroka Beartooth Wilderness where I came face to face with a River Shaman that emerged from another water movement moment. (See https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/02/02/river-shaman)

We hiked into the gorge probably two hundred feet down from the trailhead and as we approached the falls through the pine forest we could hear the rush of the water as it filled the silence found among the trees.

The Throne

The Throne

We were absorbed in the moment. The water’s voice captured us and pulled us down to the base where mist splashed and swirled, filling our senses and singing the universe’s praises. It was a sirens song.

Conditions were right for photography but we sat on the edge of a cliff before the falls in silence just breathing and trying to feel the energies that rushed through our bodies. It was just a couple of minutes and somehow, we knew when it was time to spring into action. The next two hours were effortless. Many angles, different lenses and lots of film, all procedures as smooth as could be. Composition was easy.

That afternoon Ouzel Falls spoke to us and allowed us a cosmic experience. We were not separate entities. There was no self in the equation. All was one with the hum of the universe.

For further information on Zen and photographic insight: The Zen of Creativity: Cultivating Your Artistic Life by John Daido Loori.

All images are copyrighted by Wayne Scherr, 2009, All Rights Reserved. No image may be linked to or downloaded without the written authorization of Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography. Fine Art Prints are available for purchase . Please contact me through email: wayne@rangeofvisionphotos.com or through my web site at http://www.rangeofvisionphotos.com

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The descent was rather steep. It called for a little side stepping and traversing the slope down about 1,200 feet into Hellroaring Canyon and Rock Creek drainage from the west summit of Beartooth Pass at an elevation of 10,974 feet, (3,337 m.).

I had been to these pristine alpine Twin Lakes before. The Absaroka Beartooth Wilderness has always held a special place in my thoughts. Being only 170 miles from Bozeman, my home, we have spent many nights in this area and hiked numerous trails. So I was very familiar with what to expect, high alpine tundra, boulder fields, no trail and plenty of wind with not another soul in sight.

Twin Lakes 11x17 Giclee Print

Twin Lakes 11x17 Giclee Print

This was just what I needed, a solo hike and a day of contemplation and meditation, my birthday treat. The scenery is dramatic on this the eastern edge of the Yellowstone ecosystem. I was on the longest running alpine plateau above 10,000 feet in North America.

My first target was Goat Meadow a sculpted peninsula of barren tundra that pokes its way into Rock Creek drainage. Sharp cliffs are carved into three of its sides with Twin Lakes, Mirror Lake and Rock Creek below. Several small unnamed lakes are just as inviting to the hiker.

It was slow going over the boulder field. Each step was carefully placed. A twisted ankle or worst a broken leg can be quite the detriment even to the adventurous in a wilderness area. Granite boulders were stable but uneven so I took my time. The two hundred yard crossing still took almost half an hour.

The scenery is magnificent with landscape photos in all directions. Small puffy cumulous clouds raced ferociously over the plateau so low I could almost touch them. I continued my trek above the headwall and cirque of the glacially carved bowl that forms the head of the canyon.

It was mid August and most wildflowers were already gone for the season. A few tiny sago lilies and sagebrush buttercups were still in bloom along the borders of three small receding snow fields. Instead of hiking across them I glissaded down slope effortlessly, saving my strength.

I crossed the grassy plateau searching the cliff faces for mountain goats on the Hellroaring Canyon side. Wind gusts kept me from standing still while I glassed the glacially carved cliffs. I had to sit with my arms propped on my knees. But there was no movement out there.

I continued down crossing another slushy snow field and several small running creeks ending up with the sky blue Twin Lakes at my feet. The wind picked up I sought shelter scrunching down by some large boulders that were sunk into the slope.

Of course I opted not to carry my tripod in order to secure sharp images. However I am not sure it would have helped this time because of the thirty mile per hour steady wind with surges well above that speed. I propped up my camera as best I could but couldn’t stop the sway.

So it was lunch, rest and personal thoughts regarding another year of life. I have experienced many life changes recently and there was much to contemplate. The only constant has been my continued pursuit of photography and the art of seeing.

I promised myself to further my efforts in pursuit of fine art photography and establish a writing style that communicates with and touches readers of my articles and blog posts. The rest of life will fall into place. I have faith.

After a couple of hours and a numb butt I packed up and began the long tough climb up and out of the canyon. Some days are just not for making new images. But the efforts in trying are forever worth the challenges. I am always ready for more.

For further information on the Absaroka Beartooth Wilderness please read: https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/03/14/absaroka-beartooth-wilderness/

Images used in this post are copyrighted by Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography, 2009, All Rights Reserved. Reproduction in any manner is prohibited without the written permission of Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography.  Print décor catalog and galleries can be viewed at www.rangeofvisionphotos.com Contact: wayne@rangeofvisionphotos.com

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A soft amber hued winter sun had just come up, spilling warm light over my neighbor’s house and into my yard. The temperature read minus 32, as I checked on things. Water pipes were OK. No snow last night, just thick hoarfrost blanketing the world outside.

I turned up the heat. This 100 year old log house I live in was just plain cold that morning. 

The idea was to get up early and photograph outdoors. But then I guess I reconsidered when one of my cats wanted to go out and I opened the door. He just backed right up without skipping a step as the frozen air grabbed at his whiskers. He headed back to the furnace and his pillow.

I roamed the rest of the house and headed toward the bathroom last. A flash of light through the icy window caught my eye. A closer look through the frosted glass for a few seconds and I went for my camera.

There next to the window pane were particles of the expanding universe!

Particles - 11x17 Giclee print

Particles - 16x24 - Giclee print

My white car reflected the sun sending a ball of light shinning into the window refracting prisms of color on the edges of the frost. My imagination got the best of me but a new series of images were born.

I worked the situation and shot twelve photographs before the sun hit the window directly. In seconds the frost began to melt changing everything. All those particles expanding from a core of light dissolved in an instant and then it was just my car sitting out in the cold.

It pays to be observant and open to ever the changing light patterns coupled with all the design elements that are wedged into your head. You never know when your creative imagination can grab your thoughts and lead you to the illusive image that’s sometimes right in front of you.

I made it to my computer instead of going out into the freezing winter air.  No guilt. I was just happy to have some new photographs to add to my interpretations of the natural world.

Check out this post for another illusion illustration.

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/02/02/river-shaman/

All photographs used in this entry are copyrighted by Wayne Scherr, 2009, All Rights Reserved. Reproduction in any manner is prohibited without the written permission of Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photos. Giclee and digital prints are available for home and office décor. Contact: wayne@rangeofvisionphotos.com

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I stepped out onto the lanai with the glow of dawn just hitting the mountains of Molokai across the Pailolo channel. Warm Pacific waters were calm with refreshing trade winds raising the hairs on my legs in the early morning chill.

With a hot cup of kona coffee in hand, I leaned out over the rail, breathing deep, I stared in awe. It has become a ritual.

Morning meditation island style

Morning meditation island style

Several turtles raised their heads in the bay sending ripples across the smooth glassy waters of the cove. A soft rain sound fell from shimmering palm fronds just to the left of my condo. The resonance was as gentle as the early tide washing ashore on the beach rocks.

Birds were already singing this day’s praises. One of my favorites is the White Eye or Majiro, with little lime green colored bodies and bright white circles around their eyes. They jump from tree to tree feasting mainly on those with fruit. Their “white eyes” are stunning. Just for fun we named two that hung out at the cove, Kimo and Mitsu. We watched them each morning while enjoying a peaceful breakfast on the lanai.

Bird action increased as pink light splashed against the cumulus clouds that gathered over the sea cliffs above Molokai. Red billed Luteas and Akepas, small honeycreepers, assembled in the palm trees and chirped their way along the rock retaining sea wall that lined the cove.

Calm seas added to the serenity as sunlight creped across the channel and the island of Maui awoke for the day.

This sound, the tropical scents, these memories are embedded deep into my psyche.  Having been to the islands more than thirty times it is easy to escape into these good times when I need a break from the real world. It is that meditative state of aloha.

Other related posts regarding Hawaii:
https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/05/31/lost-valleys-and-the-wettest-spot-on-earth
https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/02/14/napali-coast
https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/02/21/house-of-the-sun

 Images used in this post are copyrighted by Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography, 2009, All Rights Reserved. Reproduction in any manner is prohibited without the written permission of Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography. Contact: wayne@rangeofvisionphotos.com

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Vivid cumulus clouds gathered above Two Ocean Plateau and the Yellowstone River headwaters region in the Thorofare country of Southeastern Yellowstone National Park.  All I felt was a Cecil B. DeMille movie being portrayed before me.

I stood knee deep, with a wide angle lens, in the icy waters crouched low trying to render on film, the drama of river, clouds and the profile of a fine horse and rider galloping through the river just a few feet in front of me.

Racing the Headwaters

Racing the Headwaters

Waters splashing, my butt wet and adrenalin surging I was impressed by the striking rhythm and smoothness both Tom and his horse, Blue, plied as they raced through the river toward me. They worked in unison, a team. I couldn’t tell which liked it more the horse or rider.

With my 20mm lens and motor drive whirring I could feel the horse’s thundering hoofs vibrate on the river bottom as they blew past me like an energy wave. I got soaked. How excellent to feel so alive.

With a location like the Thorofare this backcountry adventure was even more extraordinary. We were the farthest from a paved road you can get in the lower forty-eight states.

Medicine Lake Outfitters and the Yellowstone

Medicine Lake Outfitters and the Yellowstone

My two week horseback trip with Medicine Lake Outfitters covered more than 150 miles deep into Yellowstone. We trailed through Heart Lake basin, climbed along the Continental Divide and crossed the famed Snake River several times. We bathed in its thermal regions and camped near the headwaters of the longest wild and free flowing river in North America. www.medicinelakeoutfitters.com

At camp that afternoon we built a sweat lodge with canvas tarps. We placed heated rocks into the enclosure and crawled in. After a cleansing of body pours and brain cells we ran laughing and hollering, jumping into a small tributary pool chest deep in waters that took our breath away.

The air was sweet and fresh that night. The campfire warm with rising sparks blending into the night stars above. We were isolated. The world was quiet. All was good.

For similar entries please read:
https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/03/28/yellowstone-national-park/
https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/crown-of-the-continent-glacier-national-park/
https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/05/08/salty-legs-and-mountain-goats/
https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/03/14/absaroka-beartooth-wilderness
https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/02/28/lee-metcalf-wilderness/

All images used in this entry are copyrighted by Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography. 2009, All Rights Reserved. They may not be copied or reproduced in any manner without the written permission of Wayne Scherr., Range of Vision Photos. For lease or reproduction rights contact: wayne@rangeofvisionphotos.com

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