Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Glacier National Park’ Category

Mindful Moments, the fifth publication from Wayne Scherr and Range of Vision Photography has been published and is now offered to the public for viewing and purchase. Mindful Moments is a collection of images is a cross section of imagery that ranges from the mountain landscapes of Glacier National Park to garden florals water movement and abstract photographs. All are from my home in Montana.

Mystery Creek cover for Mindful Moments

Mystery Creek cover for Mindful Moments

From the introduction:
It was the weathered wood fence and floral garden beyond at my brother’s home that defined Mindful Moments for me. This was where photographic images offered themselves to my camera and opened my heart.
Together as photographers we have discovered brief seconds of light that sculpt the natural world and in the creative process developed connections that define one’s life.
Mindful Moments have since shadowed my footsteps as I focus on broader landscapes and experimental visions. It is with great respect for the encouragement and support of my brother, Greg, that I offer these images to the viewer in hopes that sharing them will transcend my experiences into a greater awareness of thought and be moved by these, visual, Mindful Moments.
120 pages illustrated with 99 photographs
Standard landscape format 10 x 8 inches (25 x 20 cm) with soft cover $37.95
To preview and purchase your copy of Mindful Moments, go to

 

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/abstract-from-a-land-of-landscapes/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/challenge-your-photographic-vision/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/water-the-meditation-of-liquid-music/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/fear-and-persistance-of-expression/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/sense-what-the-landscape-is-telling-you/

Photographs used in this post are copyrighted by Wayne Scherr,
Range of Vision Photography, 2012, All Rights Reserved. Reproduction in any
manner is prohibited without the written permission of Wayne Scherr, Range of
Vision Photography. My image catalog can be viewed at http://www.rangeofvisionphotos.com.

You can contact me through this blog or email at: wayne@rangeofvisionphotos.com

 

Read Full Post »

The pristine ecosystem of Montana’s Glacier National Park was made for landscape
photography. Called the “Crown of the Continent” its’ graphic glacier carved
geography and flow of energy is nothing short of stunning.

Known as the “Backbone of the World” by Native Americans, Glacier has more
than a million acres of aspen and pine forests, flowery alpine meadows, clear lakes,
jagged peaks and prominent glacial-carved valleys.

The Park’s diversity is also home to nearly 70 species of mammals including the grizzly bear, and wolf, Mountain Goats and Bighorn sheep. Everywhere you turn it’s easy to get
electrified by the view and the life that surrounds you.

Up at Many Glacier on the eastern side of the Park I intended to photograph Swiftcurrent
Falls.

Swiftcurrent Falls Glacier National Park Montana
Swiftcurrent Falls

I wanted my images to be powerful and dynamic. I scouted the location and climbed down to small ledge facing the deafening cascade. You could feel the energy of the thunderous falls charge through your body.

To convey its’ power and flow I chose a 20mm wide angle lens and got in close, careful not to slip into the stream and get flushed down into the gorge and river
below.

I used the juxtaposition of background and fore ground to create an illusion of perspective. I feel it gives the viewer a sense of being there in the image, itself. It expands the experience and gives the viewer a further sense of your perception. In this
case a sweeping wide angle of power and strength.

Near far compositions create scale and interest. Coupled with the slight zigzag pattern of diagonal lines in the composition it keeps the viewer’s eyes moving back and forth
within the picture.

Swiftcurrent Falls Glacier National Park Montana
Morning at Swiftcurrent

When photographing waterscapes it’s a good idea to eliminate as much of the sky as
possible because the sky can be a distraction drawing the viewers eye away from
the essentials, the dynamics of the composition.

Overcast light, even haze is good when photographing water because it diffuses the light
so that you can employ slower shutter speeds and not get hot spots that are
created by bright light. A polarizing filter also comes in handy.

The use of motion blur and the texture that forms with water from a timed exposure is
essential in capturing the vitality of a waterfall.  Applying a full depth of field and an ISO of
100 with shutter speeds from ¼ to ½ second and you’ve got the shot. Slower
shutter speeds in brighter light would have washed out the highlights and
faster speeds would have distracted from the impression of movement and flow I
wanted to portray.

I encourage readers to get out and photograph water. Experiment with liquid movement,
motion and blur as design elements to express yourself. Be in the moment. Let
me know how it goes.

Get helpful information from these websites:

Glacier
National Park – www.nps.gov/glac

Glacier’s webcams – www.nps.gov/glac/photosmultimedia/webcams.html

Lodging and activities – www.glacierparkinc.com

Montana Visitor’s Guide – www.visitmt.com

Sunrise Sunset calendars – www.sunrisesunset.com

The Photographer’s Ephemeris – www.photoephemeris.com

Related Posts:

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2011/09/24/astracts-from-a-land-of-landscapes/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/05/08/salty-legs-and-mountain-goats/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/05/02/crown-of-the-continent-glacier-national-park-montana/

Photographs used in this post are copyrighted by Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography, 2011, All Rights Reserved. Reproduction in any manner is prohibited without the written permission of Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography. My image catalog can be viewed at http://www.rangeofvisionphotos.com.

You can contact me through this blog or email at: wayne@rangeofvisionphotos.com

Read Full Post »

Entering Glacier from Babb on the eastern side of this National Park in Montana
I drove the potholed two lane road toward Many Glacier.
Aspen trees lined the road and whipped by my car window.

Bursts of laser white pulsed backlighting the aspens’ deeper shadows. Traveling at 40 miles per
hour sunlight reflecting off Lake Sherburne flashed bright specular highlights
across my face like a strobe. The sub alpine lake shimmered in the afternoon
light drawing my attention.

Lake Sherburne Glacier National Park Montana

Lake Sherburne Glacier National Park Montana

It was abeautiful day with blue skies, fresh mountain air and no one else on the road.
Each time I explore Glacier I am inspired by the dramatic landscapes that
blanket both sides of the Continental Divide, here in this Crown Jewel of
Montana. This sparkling day was no different.

I grabbed my camera that is always waiting at my side and opened the window. A quarter of
a second exposure, the lens set at infinity and with the car rolling down the
road, I couldn’t resist tripping the shutter.

Implied motion within a still image has always been intriguing to me.  Obviously composition is difficult but leaning toward spontaneity keeps the adrenalin going and in this situation it is all
trial and error anyway.

swift current creek glacier national  park montana

Swiftcurrent Creek Montana

I don’t know what the aperture was. It doesn’t matter. That kind of thing is
immaterial. What counts is inspiration and being there. This kind of exercise
is more primal. It is recording the flow of energy. Trying something different,
experimenting with what comes your way keeps the photographer’s creativity in flux.

I was excited by the revelations that followed.

The extended exposures formed the definition of an abstract image with patterns,
harmonies of color and touchable textures. They ask the viewer to participate
by projecting their thoughts and experiences into the question of what these
pictures are about.

What do you see in these turbulent shifts of light and motion? Is it something new?
Do they engage you in thought?

Let me know your impressions or comments.

Related Posts:

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/challenge-your-photographic-vision/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/water-the-meditation-of-liquid-music/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/fear-and-persistance-of-expression/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/sense-what-the-landscape-is-telling-you/

Photographs used in this post are copyrighted by Wayne Scherr,
Range of Vision Photography, 2011, All Rights Reserved. Reproduction in any
manner is prohibited without the written permission of Wayne Scherr, Range of
Vision Photography. My image catalog can be viewed at http://www.rangeofvisionphotos.com.

You can contact me through this blog or email at: wayne@rangeofvisionphotos.com

Read Full Post »