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Archive for the ‘Giclee Prints’ Category

The usual response I get when someone is viewing one of my abstract photographs is, “What is it?”

My reply is, “What do you see in it?” That is what I like about interpretive imagery. It is all subjective and I feel it when a photo touches and entices the viewer to stop and investigate, it is a success.

Asteroids

Northern Lights

Solar Flare

Abstract photographs are all how about the subject makes you feel. When your subject is color, texture and shapes assembled into a dynamic composition that departs from reality the challenge is on to grab the viewer’s attention.
Working on interpretive imagery goes beyond the usual rules of landscape photography. It is both fascinating and compelling changing one’s perception.
A visual encounter with some watercolor painting presented splashes of blending colors and non-uniform shapes. These macro images are but small pieces and parts of the overall scene.
What do these compositions suggest to you? Perhaps they are asteroids racing through the cosmos or the Aurora Borealis shinning in the heavens of another world? It is all up to your imagination to complete the communication process.
Related posts:
https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/abstract-from-a-land-of-landscapes/
https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/challenge-your-photographic-vision/
https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/water-the-meditation-of-liquid-music/
https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/fear-and-persistance-of-expression/
https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/sense-what-the-landscape-is-telling-you/
Photographs used in this post are copyrighted by Wayne Scherr,
Range of Vision Photography, 2012, All Rights Reserved. Reproduction in any
manner is prohibited without the written permission of Wayne Scherr, Range of
Vision Photography. My image catalog can be viewed at http://www.rangeofvisionphotos.com.
You can contact me through this blog or email at: wayne@rangeofvisionphotos.com

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I cherish concentrated moments in time with no distractions of busy thoughts and mind ramblings. It is what I look for each time I pick up my camera and go on the hunt for something new to record.

abstract photograph red dunes

Red Dunes - Limited Edition Print

Having recently viewed an online website gallery looking for new and different directions to pursue I found a series of abstract images that offered splashes of color with little form or shape.  I couldn’t decipher what the photos content was but I was inspired to think and imagine what I could do as a result of this inspiration.

I like to try and react spontaneously to the moment at hand even if I have assembled some of the elements to be used in the photo session.  My goal is always to get lost in the creative process.

Without obsessively thinking I approached the subject knowing I wanted to construct abstract prints. A straight forward, documentary approach didn’t work for my vision. Depicting an abstract scene is done by using key elements to develop a visual appeal. It is not about rules or established concepts. It is about how you perceive the subject and interpret the elements before you.

Blueshift - Limited Edition Print

Blueshift - Limited Edition Print

I believe abstracts should challenge the viewer and draw them into the image so they can use their experiences to engage, challenge and excite them. That is the communication process, viewer involvement.

My key element was static color without any real shape or form. I like implied motion and movement and I thought this would give some shape and form to the subject. Using a panning and slow shutter combination technique I achieved the texture and form I was after.

What were these images of? Where they sand dunes at sunset? Highlights reflected in a pond? Where they foreign skies from a distant planet? I want the viewer to decide for themselves. What is it that you see in this form of artistic expression? Let me know what you think.

Curvature - Limited Edition Print

Curvature - Limited Edition Print

Related Posts:

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/abstract-from-a-land-of-landscapes/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/challenge-your-photographic-vision/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/water-the-meditation-of-liquid-music/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/fear-and-persistance-of-expression/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/sense-what-the-landscape-is-telling-you/

Photographs used in this post are copyrighted by Wayne Scherr,
Range of Vision Photography, 2012, All Rights Reserved. Reproduction in any
manner is prohibited without the written permission of Wayne Scherr, Range of
Vision Photography. My image catalog can be viewed at http://www.rangeofvisionphotos.com.

You can contact me through this blog or email at: wayne@rangeofvisionphotos.com

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The pristine ecosystem of Montana’s Glacier National Park was made for landscape
photography. Called the “Crown of the Continent” its’ graphic glacier carved
geography and flow of energy is nothing short of stunning.

Known as the “Backbone of the World” by Native Americans, Glacier has more
than a million acres of aspen and pine forests, flowery alpine meadows, clear lakes,
jagged peaks and prominent glacial-carved valleys.

The Park’s diversity is also home to nearly 70 species of mammals including the grizzly bear, and wolf, Mountain Goats and Bighorn sheep. Everywhere you turn it’s easy to get
electrified by the view and the life that surrounds you.

Up at Many Glacier on the eastern side of the Park I intended to photograph Swiftcurrent
Falls.

Swiftcurrent Falls Glacier National Park Montana
Swiftcurrent Falls

I wanted my images to be powerful and dynamic. I scouted the location and climbed down to small ledge facing the deafening cascade. You could feel the energy of the thunderous falls charge through your body.

To convey its’ power and flow I chose a 20mm wide angle lens and got in close, careful not to slip into the stream and get flushed down into the gorge and river
below.

I used the juxtaposition of background and fore ground to create an illusion of perspective. I feel it gives the viewer a sense of being there in the image, itself. It expands the experience and gives the viewer a further sense of your perception. In this
case a sweeping wide angle of power and strength.

Near far compositions create scale and interest. Coupled with the slight zigzag pattern of diagonal lines in the composition it keeps the viewer’s eyes moving back and forth
within the picture.

Swiftcurrent Falls Glacier National Park Montana
Morning at Swiftcurrent

When photographing waterscapes it’s a good idea to eliminate as much of the sky as
possible because the sky can be a distraction drawing the viewers eye away from
the essentials, the dynamics of the composition.

Overcast light, even haze is good when photographing water because it diffuses the light
so that you can employ slower shutter speeds and not get hot spots that are
created by bright light. A polarizing filter also comes in handy.

The use of motion blur and the texture that forms with water from a timed exposure is
essential in capturing the vitality of a waterfall.  Applying a full depth of field and an ISO of
100 with shutter speeds from ¼ to ½ second and you’ve got the shot. Slower
shutter speeds in brighter light would have washed out the highlights and
faster speeds would have distracted from the impression of movement and flow I
wanted to portray.

I encourage readers to get out and photograph water. Experiment with liquid movement,
motion and blur as design elements to express yourself. Be in the moment. Let
me know how it goes.

Get helpful information from these websites:

Glacier
National Park – www.nps.gov/glac

Glacier’s webcams – www.nps.gov/glac/photosmultimedia/webcams.html

Lodging and activities – www.glacierparkinc.com

Montana Visitor’s Guide – www.visitmt.com

Sunrise Sunset calendars – www.sunrisesunset.com

The Photographer’s Ephemeris – www.photoephemeris.com

Related Posts:

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2011/09/24/astracts-from-a-land-of-landscapes/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/05/08/salty-legs-and-mountain-goats/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/05/02/crown-of-the-continent-glacier-national-park-montana/

Photographs used in this post are copyrighted by Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography, 2011, All Rights Reserved. Reproduction in any manner is prohibited without the written permission of Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography. My image catalog can be viewed at http://www.rangeofvisionphotos.com.

You can contact me through this blog or email at: wayne@rangeofvisionphotos.com

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In Photography with the capture of form, texture and color, we
depict what we perceive as real and meld it into a more fantasy style of illustration.
This is called an abstract.

The visual connection between the subject and viewer is formed by
the viewer’s imagination, perception and experiences. Their insight transcends
the visual elements of the image in the communication process.

Storm on the Horizon is actually moving water
rushing over colorful rocks in an alpine mountain stream high in the Absaroka
Beartooth Wilderness of Montana. I used a timed exposure of three seconds and
this implied the motion I wanted to convey. Depth was created by the horizontal
lines of surging water and specular highlights it picked up in the foreground.

Photographic abstract water movement

Storm on the Horizon

Incorporating a second layer of flowing water gave the composition
added depth and movement developing a translucent curtain above the underlying
streambed. This gave the image a windswept driving rain illusion. Perhaps a
hurricane or tropical storm in thought.

During post processing, using Photoshop, I enhanced color
saturation in the submerged rocks focusing on the red hues. I felt this gave
life to the image with an almost sunset feeling.

So what do you perceive when viewing this photograph, a sunset? Is
this a storm front on the ocean? Does it matter what the photographer saw or
thought he saw when composing in the viewfinder? Is it up to the viewer and
their experiences that actually determine the final communication between the
image, viewer and photographer?

Forget me not – In this floral abstract photograph I went for
the color effect of bright blue for its visual appeal.

abstract photograph blue florals

Forget me nots

Over the last few summers I have tried to depict Forget- me -not
flowers in a direct way. I have used them as background splashes of color,
as distinctive out of focus bokeh (boquet) successfully but when isolating them
as a single documentary image it just didn’t work the way I envisioned.

Earlier this season I worked with panning the camera during
exposures, especially on trees, and was happy with the results. When these
brilliant sky blue flowers blanketed the garden midsummer I thought of this
technique again and used it to capture the color and texture of this ground
cover.

In order to slow the shutter speed to convey this style of motion
I added a polarizing filter to my wide angle lens and shot a series of one
quarter to one half second exposures. With the shutter open I panned the
camera, while attached to a tripod, and liked the results.

In post processing, again, I utilized Photoshop to enhance the
blue hues resulting in a dynamic color abstract photograph.

When photographing abstracts you have to kind of forget what your
subject matter really is, and be open to different uses of lenses, camera
settings and post processing techniques.

Imagination plays the most important role in determining the final
results of the finished print. Think in terms of shapes, textures and color
combining them to make a unique image that is not what it is but what your
imagination sees.

Related Posts:

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/challenge-your-photographic-vision/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/water-the-meditation-of-liquid-music/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/fear-and-persistance-of-expression/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/sense-what-the-landscape-is-telling-you/

Photographs used in this post are copyrighted by Wayne Scherr,
Range of Vision Photography, 2010, All Rights Reserved. Reproduction in any
manner is prohibited without the written permission of Wayne Scherr, Range of
Vision Photography. My image catalog can be viewed at http://www.rangeofvisionphotos.com.

You can contact me through this blog or email at: wayne@rangeofvisionphotos.com

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Outside it was minus 5 degrees with crystal clear skies and a feathery frost forming on my windowpane. It stopped snowing during the night but there was still enough moisture in the air to freeze and form tiny crystal patterns.

I had been checking this window for frost almost every morning throughout the winter. Most of the time there’s nothing interesting.  There were usually just small streaks of grey granular frost with no real graphic pattern or distinctive texture.

Frostscape

Frostscape 12x12

But, once in awhile the elements seem to line up and it’s a race to capture the scene before it melts away with the warmth of the direct light of sunrise. Crystalline frost is formed directly from the water vapor in the air.  As the vapor runs along the contours of the glass it goes right from being a gas to a frozen solid, without transforming from a liquid state first. These are the intriguing textures and designs that can be worked into surreal compositions.

I quickly set up my camera and used only ambient outside light to backlight the delicate structure of the hoar frost. I wanted to hold the viewer’s attention within the frame of composition so I focused just on the crystal formations looking for patterns.

Using a shallow depth of field gave me the separation I wanted to keep the distracting vertical lines of a backyard shed out of the background.

Frost Pattern

Frost Pattern 11x17

I had about ten minutes to check out several compositions and prepare visually before the light would begin to melt the intricate designs.  It was some of the most delicate hoar frost I’ve seen. In this image I liked how the crystals have just caught the first light of day creating dimension and texture within the scene.

The sparkle within the ice crystals changed quickly and within seconds all the little lines dividing the dynamic crystal structures filled in and pooled and like an ancestry tree forked into branches before running down the glass.

All photographs used in this entry are copyrighted by Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography, 2011, All Rights Reserved. Reproduction of any kind is prohibited. If you wish reproduction rights please contact: wayne@rangeofvisionphotos.com

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Been working on a rebuild and design of my website http://www.rangeofvisionphotos.com for several weeks now and finally after some trouble shooting this weekend and a long phone call into my host server have things up and running.

I have changed some of the galleries deleting some older images and collections. Along with the update I have added a special gallery. It is one that highlights water and movement featuring the magical flow and energies that only water can provide to the viewer.

I particularly like the images entitled Breaking Through, River Shaman and Water Spirits. Each is very distinct and emote a unique connection with the spiritual side of nature and my interpretation.

Water Movement - Breaking Through

11x17 Reproduction entitled Breaking Through

The abstract collection contains many new images and in particular I like Planetary Storm, Signs and Quaking Aspens. They have a tendency to create thought provoking conversations with Storm and Signs being close ups of ice and the Aspens a dreamy blur of implied motion.

In the Panorama Collection both the Garden Panorama and Color Pallet are new and very different in image presentation. Color Pallet is an abstract interpretation of the Garden pan image location.

Included in the Landscape collection are photographs from Montana, Idaho, Hawaii and Utah. All are intriguing locations to enjoy and contemplate their distinctive settings. Twin Lakes and Honopu Valley are awe inspiring sites.

Abstract interpretation Quaking Aspens

11x17 Reproduction - Quaking Aspens

My Floral Collection is the most extensive with numerous possibilities of picture pairs and sets that can be combined for outstanding wall décor and layouts with everything from Bunny Tails and Dahlias to Orchids and tulips. Jewels and Floral Harmony have recently appeared in calendars showcasing Montana Photographers.

So I invite readers of this Blog to visit my website: www.rangeofvisionphotos.com  and I hope you find something of interest and stimulation to your senses.

You will also find connections to two books that I published since December. Range of Vision – Discovering the Magic of the Present Moment and Horizon of Stars – A Photographic Journal of an African Safari.

Layouts on a third publication entitled Edge of Heaven – A Photo Essay on Hawaii is in the works and should be available in April/May.

All photographs used in this entry are copyrighted by Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography, 2011, All Rights Reserved. Reproduction of any kind is prohibited. If you wish reproduction rights please contact: wayne@rangeofvisionphotos.com

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Out of curiosity and in an effort to continue forward movement regarding my creative efforts  I have been doing a little research and decided to learn some new technology regarding HDR photography.

HDR or High Dynamic Range photography is a post processing activity that combines a number of images with different contrast ratios that are unfeasible to complete with just one exposure. Usually you take three photos of the same scene at different shutter speeds and then combine them into one image. I have also tried this simply by bracketing, adjusting the exposure settings to plus one stop your normal exposure and minus one stop.

So you get three images, one overexposed, one for midtones and then one underexposed.  These are combined with software, I used Photoshop CS3. This process gives you details in both highlights and shadows that are joined with the medium or normal exposure giving you results that seem to be more accurate to what your eyes actually perceived at the scene.

What I found in working out the process is that it can work great for some images and not so much for others. My first attempts looked fake and artificial. The colors were exaggerated to the point that the scenic landscape I was working on looked gaudy.

However, when the HDR process really worked the image was much more suggestive of what I actually saw when I tripped the shutter on location. Shadow details were crisp and clear and the highlight information was bright and smooth. The final print represented what was much closer to actually being there and what I saw.

I have included a couple of examples of what I found in this post for your review.

Blackeyed Susans

Normal range image - Blackeyed Susans

HDR Blackeyed Susans

High Dynamic Range image - Blackeyed Susans

There are many HDR software applications out there along with numerous books and
Elephant Brothers

Normal range image - Elephant Brothers

tutorials on how to apply the process. Like most things this is just another tool that you can

HDR photograph - Elephant Brothers

High Dynamic Range image - Elephant Brothers

apply to your visual interpretations. It is always good to learn and experiment.  See what works for your style of photography.

I like the distinguishing details HDR portrays and as long as the colors are not overstated I’ll continue to have this method in my arsenal and use it to interpret different scenes and express my creativity. I encourage you to take a look at the HDR practice. It is definitely worth the time and effort.

All photographs used in this entry are copyrighted by Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography, 2011, All Rights Reserved. Reproduction of any kind is prohibited. If you wish reproduction rights please contact: wayne@rangeofvisionphotos.com

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