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Archive for the ‘Giclee Prints’ Category

The usual response I get when someone is viewing one of my abstract photographs is, “What is it?”

My reply is, “What do you see in it?” That is what I like about interpretive imagery. It is all subjective and I feel it when a photo touches and entices the viewer to stop and investigate, it is a success.

Asteroids

Northern Lights

Solar Flare

Abstract photographs are all how about the subject makes you feel. When your subject is color, texture and shapes assembled into a dynamic composition that departs from reality the challenge is on to grab the viewer’s attention.
Working on interpretive imagery goes beyond the usual rules of landscape photography. It is both fascinating and compelling changing one’s perception.
A visual encounter with some watercolor painting presented splashes of blending colors and non-uniform shapes. These macro images are but small pieces and parts of the overall scene.
What do these compositions suggest to you? Perhaps they are asteroids racing through the cosmos or the Aurora Borealis shinning in the heavens of another world? It is all up to your imagination to complete the communication process.
Related posts:
https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/abstract-from-a-land-of-landscapes/
https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/challenge-your-photographic-vision/
https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/water-the-meditation-of-liquid-music/
https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/fear-and-persistance-of-expression/
https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/sense-what-the-landscape-is-telling-you/
Photographs used in this post are copyrighted by Wayne Scherr,
Range of Vision Photography, 2012, All Rights Reserved. Reproduction in any
manner is prohibited without the written permission of Wayne Scherr, Range of
Vision Photography. My image catalog can be viewed at http://www.rangeofvisionphotos.com.
You can contact me through this blog or email at: wayne@rangeofvisionphotos.com

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I cherish concentrated moments in time with no distractions of busy thoughts and mind ramblings. It is what I look for each time I pick up my camera and go on the hunt for something new to record.

abstract photograph red dunes

Red Dunes - Limited Edition Print

Having recently viewed an online website gallery looking for new and different directions to pursue I found a series of abstract images that offered splashes of color with little form or shape.  I couldn’t decipher what the photos content was but I was inspired to think and imagine what I could do as a result of this inspiration.

I like to try and react spontaneously to the moment at hand even if I have assembled some of the elements to be used in the photo session.  My goal is always to get lost in the creative process.

Without obsessively thinking I approached the subject knowing I wanted to construct abstract prints. A straight forward, documentary approach didn’t work for my vision. Depicting an abstract scene is done by using key elements to develop a visual appeal. It is not about rules or established concepts. It is about how you perceive the subject and interpret the elements before you.

Blueshift - Limited Edition Print

Blueshift - Limited Edition Print

I believe abstracts should challenge the viewer and draw them into the image so they can use their experiences to engage, challenge and excite them. That is the communication process, viewer involvement.

My key element was static color without any real shape or form. I like implied motion and movement and I thought this would give some shape and form to the subject. Using a panning and slow shutter combination technique I achieved the texture and form I was after.

What were these images of? Where they sand dunes at sunset? Highlights reflected in a pond? Where they foreign skies from a distant planet? I want the viewer to decide for themselves. What is it that you see in this form of artistic expression? Let me know what you think.

Curvature - Limited Edition Print

Curvature - Limited Edition Print

Related Posts:

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/abstract-from-a-land-of-landscapes/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/challenge-your-photographic-vision/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/water-the-meditation-of-liquid-music/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/fear-and-persistance-of-expression/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/sense-what-the-landscape-is-telling-you/

Photographs used in this post are copyrighted by Wayne Scherr,
Range of Vision Photography, 2012, All Rights Reserved. Reproduction in any
manner is prohibited without the written permission of Wayne Scherr, Range of
Vision Photography. My image catalog can be viewed at http://www.rangeofvisionphotos.com.

You can contact me through this blog or email at: wayne@rangeofvisionphotos.com

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The pristine ecosystem of Montana’s Glacier National Park was made for landscape
photography. Called the “Crown of the Continent” its’ graphic glacier carved
geography and flow of energy is nothing short of stunning.

Known as the “Backbone of the World” by Native Americans, Glacier has more
than a million acres of aspen and pine forests, flowery alpine meadows, clear lakes,
jagged peaks and prominent glacial-carved valleys.

The Park’s diversity is also home to nearly 70 species of mammals including the grizzly bear, and wolf, Mountain Goats and Bighorn sheep. Everywhere you turn it’s easy to get
electrified by the view and the life that surrounds you.

Up at Many Glacier on the eastern side of the Park I intended to photograph Swiftcurrent
Falls.

Swiftcurrent Falls Glacier National Park Montana
Swiftcurrent Falls

I wanted my images to be powerful and dynamic. I scouted the location and climbed down to small ledge facing the deafening cascade. You could feel the energy of the thunderous falls charge through your body.

To convey its’ power and flow I chose a 20mm wide angle lens and got in close, careful not to slip into the stream and get flushed down into the gorge and river
below.

I used the juxtaposition of background and fore ground to create an illusion of perspective. I feel it gives the viewer a sense of being there in the image, itself. It expands the experience and gives the viewer a further sense of your perception. In this
case a sweeping wide angle of power and strength.

Near far compositions create scale and interest. Coupled with the slight zigzag pattern of diagonal lines in the composition it keeps the viewer’s eyes moving back and forth
within the picture.

Swiftcurrent Falls Glacier National Park Montana
Morning at Swiftcurrent

When photographing waterscapes it’s a good idea to eliminate as much of the sky as
possible because the sky can be a distraction drawing the viewers eye away from
the essentials, the dynamics of the composition.

Overcast light, even haze is good when photographing water because it diffuses the light
so that you can employ slower shutter speeds and not get hot spots that are
created by bright light. A polarizing filter also comes in handy.

The use of motion blur and the texture that forms with water from a timed exposure is
essential in capturing the vitality of a waterfall.  Applying a full depth of field and an ISO of
100 with shutter speeds from ¼ to ½ second and you’ve got the shot. Slower
shutter speeds in brighter light would have washed out the highlights and
faster speeds would have distracted from the impression of movement and flow I
wanted to portray.

I encourage readers to get out and photograph water. Experiment with liquid movement,
motion and blur as design elements to express yourself. Be in the moment. Let
me know how it goes.

Get helpful information from these websites:

Glacier
National Park – www.nps.gov/glac

Glacier’s webcams – www.nps.gov/glac/photosmultimedia/webcams.html

Lodging and activities – www.glacierparkinc.com

Montana Visitor’s Guide – www.visitmt.com

Sunrise Sunset calendars – www.sunrisesunset.com

The Photographer’s Ephemeris – www.photoephemeris.com

Related Posts:

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2011/09/24/astracts-from-a-land-of-landscapes/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/05/08/salty-legs-and-mountain-goats/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/05/02/crown-of-the-continent-glacier-national-park-montana/

Photographs used in this post are copyrighted by Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography, 2011, All Rights Reserved. Reproduction in any manner is prohibited without the written permission of Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography. My image catalog can be viewed at http://www.rangeofvisionphotos.com.

You can contact me through this blog or email at: wayne@rangeofvisionphotos.com

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In Photography with the capture of form, texture and color, we
depict what we perceive as real and meld it into a more fantasy style of illustration.
This is called an abstract.

The visual connection between the subject and viewer is formed by
the viewer’s imagination, perception and experiences. Their insight transcends
the visual elements of the image in the communication process.

Storm on the Horizon is actually moving water
rushing over colorful rocks in an alpine mountain stream high in the Absaroka
Beartooth Wilderness of Montana. I used a timed exposure of three seconds and
this implied the motion I wanted to convey. Depth was created by the horizontal
lines of surging water and specular highlights it picked up in the foreground.

Photographic abstract water movement

Storm on the Horizon

Incorporating a second layer of flowing water gave the composition
added depth and movement developing a translucent curtain above the underlying
streambed. This gave the image a windswept driving rain illusion. Perhaps a
hurricane or tropical storm in thought.

During post processing, using Photoshop, I enhanced color
saturation in the submerged rocks focusing on the red hues. I felt this gave
life to the image with an almost sunset feeling.

So what do you perceive when viewing this photograph, a sunset? Is
this a storm front on the ocean? Does it matter what the photographer saw or
thought he saw when composing in the viewfinder? Is it up to the viewer and
their experiences that actually determine the final communication between the
image, viewer and photographer?

Forget me not – In this floral abstract photograph I went for
the color effect of bright blue for its visual appeal.

abstract photograph blue florals

Forget me nots

Over the last few summers I have tried to depict Forget- me -not
flowers in a direct way. I have used them as background splashes of color,
as distinctive out of focus bokeh (boquet) successfully but when isolating them
as a single documentary image it just didn’t work the way I envisioned.

Earlier this season I worked with panning the camera during
exposures, especially on trees, and was happy with the results. When these
brilliant sky blue flowers blanketed the garden midsummer I thought of this
technique again and used it to capture the color and texture of this ground
cover.

In order to slow the shutter speed to convey this style of motion
I added a polarizing filter to my wide angle lens and shot a series of one
quarter to one half second exposures. With the shutter open I panned the
camera, while attached to a tripod, and liked the results.

In post processing, again, I utilized Photoshop to enhance the
blue hues resulting in a dynamic color abstract photograph.

When photographing abstracts you have to kind of forget what your
subject matter really is, and be open to different uses of lenses, camera
settings and post processing techniques.

Imagination plays the most important role in determining the final
results of the finished print. Think in terms of shapes, textures and color
combining them to make a unique image that is not what it is but what your
imagination sees.

Related Posts:

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/challenge-your-photographic-vision/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/water-the-meditation-of-liquid-music/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/fear-and-persistance-of-expression/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/sense-what-the-landscape-is-telling-you/

Photographs used in this post are copyrighted by Wayne Scherr,
Range of Vision Photography, 2010, All Rights Reserved. Reproduction in any
manner is prohibited without the written permission of Wayne Scherr, Range of
Vision Photography. My image catalog can be viewed at http://www.rangeofvisionphotos.com.

You can contact me through this blog or email at: wayne@rangeofvisionphotos.com

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Outside it was minus 5 degrees with crystal clear skies and a feathery frost forming on my windowpane. It stopped snowing during the night but there was still enough moisture in the air to freeze and form tiny crystal patterns.

I had been checking this window for frost almost every morning throughout the winter. Most of the time there’s nothing interesting.  There were usually just small streaks of grey granular frost with no real graphic pattern or distinctive texture.

Frostscape

Frostscape 12x12

But, once in awhile the elements seem to line up and it’s a race to capture the scene before it melts away with the warmth of the direct light of sunrise. Crystalline frost is formed directly from the water vapor in the air.  As the vapor runs along the contours of the glass it goes right from being a gas to a frozen solid, without transforming from a liquid state first. These are the intriguing textures and designs that can be worked into surreal compositions.

I quickly set up my camera and used only ambient outside light to backlight the delicate structure of the hoar frost. I wanted to hold the viewer’s attention within the frame of composition so I focused just on the crystal formations looking for patterns.

Using a shallow depth of field gave me the separation I wanted to keep the distracting vertical lines of a backyard shed out of the background.

Frost Pattern

Frost Pattern 11x17

I had about ten minutes to check out several compositions and prepare visually before the light would begin to melt the intricate designs.  It was some of the most delicate hoar frost I’ve seen. In this image I liked how the crystals have just caught the first light of day creating dimension and texture within the scene.

The sparkle within the ice crystals changed quickly and within seconds all the little lines dividing the dynamic crystal structures filled in and pooled and like an ancestry tree forked into branches before running down the glass.

All photographs used in this entry are copyrighted by Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography, 2011, All Rights Reserved. Reproduction of any kind is prohibited. If you wish reproduction rights please contact: wayne@rangeofvisionphotos.com

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Been working on a rebuild and design of my website http://www.rangeofvisionphotos.com for several weeks now and finally after some trouble shooting this weekend and a long phone call into my host server have things up and running.

I have changed some of the galleries deleting some older images and collections. Along with the update I have added a special gallery. It is one that highlights water and movement featuring the magical flow and energies that only water can provide to the viewer.

I particularly like the images entitled Breaking Through, River Shaman and Water Spirits. Each is very distinct and emote a unique connection with the spiritual side of nature and my interpretation.

Water Movement - Breaking Through

11x17 Reproduction entitled Breaking Through

The abstract collection contains many new images and in particular I like Planetary Storm, Signs and Quaking Aspens. They have a tendency to create thought provoking conversations with Storm and Signs being close ups of ice and the Aspens a dreamy blur of implied motion.

In the Panorama Collection both the Garden Panorama and Color Pallet are new and very different in image presentation. Color Pallet is an abstract interpretation of the Garden pan image location.

Included in the Landscape collection are photographs from Montana, Idaho, Hawaii and Utah. All are intriguing locations to enjoy and contemplate their distinctive settings. Twin Lakes and Honopu Valley are awe inspiring sites.

Abstract interpretation Quaking Aspens

11x17 Reproduction - Quaking Aspens

My Floral Collection is the most extensive with numerous possibilities of picture pairs and sets that can be combined for outstanding wall décor and layouts with everything from Bunny Tails and Dahlias to Orchids and tulips. Jewels and Floral Harmony have recently appeared in calendars showcasing Montana Photographers.

So I invite readers of this Blog to visit my website: www.rangeofvisionphotos.com  and I hope you find something of interest and stimulation to your senses.

You will also find connections to two books that I published since December. Range of Vision – Discovering the Magic of the Present Moment and Horizon of Stars – A Photographic Journal of an African Safari.

Layouts on a third publication entitled Edge of Heaven – A Photo Essay on Hawaii is in the works and should be available in April/May.

All photographs used in this entry are copyrighted by Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography, 2011, All Rights Reserved. Reproduction of any kind is prohibited. If you wish reproduction rights please contact: wayne@rangeofvisionphotos.com

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Out of curiosity and in an effort to continue forward movement regarding my creative efforts  I have been doing a little research and decided to learn some new technology regarding HDR photography.

HDR or High Dynamic Range photography is a post processing activity that combines a number of images with different contrast ratios that are unfeasible to complete with just one exposure. Usually you take three photos of the same scene at different shutter speeds and then combine them into one image. I have also tried this simply by bracketing, adjusting the exposure settings to plus one stop your normal exposure and minus one stop.

So you get three images, one overexposed, one for midtones and then one underexposed.  These are combined with software, I used Photoshop CS3. This process gives you details in both highlights and shadows that are joined with the medium or normal exposure giving you results that seem to be more accurate to what your eyes actually perceived at the scene.

What I found in working out the process is that it can work great for some images and not so much for others. My first attempts looked fake and artificial. The colors were exaggerated to the point that the scenic landscape I was working on looked gaudy.

However, when the HDR process really worked the image was much more suggestive of what I actually saw when I tripped the shutter on location. Shadow details were crisp and clear and the highlight information was bright and smooth. The final print represented what was much closer to actually being there and what I saw.

I have included a couple of examples of what I found in this post for your review.

Blackeyed Susans

Normal range image - Blackeyed Susans

HDR Blackeyed Susans

High Dynamic Range image - Blackeyed Susans

There are many HDR software applications out there along with numerous books and
Elephant Brothers

Normal range image - Elephant Brothers

tutorials on how to apply the process. Like most things this is just another tool that you can

HDR photograph - Elephant Brothers

High Dynamic Range image - Elephant Brothers

apply to your visual interpretations. It is always good to learn and experiment.  See what works for your style of photography.

I like the distinguishing details HDR portrays and as long as the colors are not overstated I’ll continue to have this method in my arsenal and use it to interpret different scenes and express my creativity. I encourage you to take a look at the HDR practice. It is definitely worth the time and effort.

All photographs used in this entry are copyrighted by Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography, 2011, All Rights Reserved. Reproduction of any kind is prohibited. If you wish reproduction rights please contact: wayne@rangeofvisionphotos.com

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Range of Vision – Discovering the Magic of the Present Moment

New Book by Wayne Scherr

Range of Vision is a photographic portfolio by Fine Art Photographer and Photojournalist Wayne Scherr.   Based in Montana, Wayne’s images presented in this book are a selection of nature photographs made in pursuit of self discovery and expression.

The Still Point is at the heart of the creative process. To be “Still” or “In the Moment” means to empty your psyche from the incessant flow of thoughts and create a state of consciousness that is open and receptive to your surroundings.

The Range of Vision portrayed in this full color book conveys a meditative approach to the design elements of  implied motion and movement of falling water, creeks and streams and features garden florals and interpretive abstracts.

80 pages illustrated with 87 photographs.

Standard landscape format 10 x 8 inches (25 x 20 cm) with soft cover $37.95

To preview and purchase your copy of Range of Vision , go to

http://www.blurb.com/books/1877388

Black-eyed Susans, garden image

Black-eyed Susans

 

Web site: http://www.rangeofvisionphotos.com

Blog: www.myphotovisions.wordpress.com

Contact: wayne@rangeofvisionphotos.com

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Horizon of Stars, a Photographic Safari Journal

New Book by Wayne Scherr 

Horizon of Stars is a photographic journal with text depicting a wildlife safari to Eastern Africa and the country of Tanzania. The adventurous journey covers Serengeti, Tarangeri, Manyara, Arusha and Ngorongoro National Parks. Wildlife encounters and photographic illustrations include tree climbing lions, charging elephants and screaming baboons.

Photojournalist and Fine Art Photographer Wayne Scherr documented this savanna sojourn while preparing a marketing plan for a safari outfitter that operated out of Arusha, Tanzania.

80 pages (106 color photographs)

Standard Landscape 10×8 inches (25×20 cm) with soft cover ($39.95)

To preview and purchase your copy: Horizon of Stars http://www.blurb.com/books/1924512

 
 
 

Lion in Ngorongoro crater, Tanzania

Lion in Ngorongoro crater, Tanzania

 

Web site: http://www.rangeofvisionphotos.com

Blog: www.myphotovisions.wordpress.com

Contact: wayne@rangeofvisionphotos.com

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Entering my brother’s garden, I already knew that I was too late in the season to photograph the Persian Jewel flowers he previously recorded, but I didn’t expect the inflated seed pods to be so bright and colorful, like the blossoms were.

Snaking through several raised multicolored plant beds full of hundreds of blossoms with my tripod held high, there they were, crowding out an old weathered wood trough about five feet long and seven inches wide. They looked like a mini hedge of little gem-colored aliens, with ferny feelers reaching out into the surrounding air.

Jeweled Capsules - 12x 12 print

Persian Jewels are also known as Wild Fennel and by the Botanical name of Nigella damaascena. The flowers themselves are a bright mixture of saturated shades of mauve, light blue and white, lavender, purple, rose. They are excellent annual flower garden plants belonging to the buttercup family (Ranunculaceae).

But as they presented their balloon shaped seed pods to the camera this morning it was just as exciting as any floral display because it was so unexpected.

We photographed the Jewels at different time of the day portraying at least three unique interpretations. Early morning just after sunrise direct backlight added to the gem quality by catching highlights off the dew.

flowers, seed pods, persian jewels

Persian Jewels seed pods 11x17 print

A white reflector was used to fill light into the shadows of the pods which then gave some emphasis to the veins and lines in the capsules’ skin.

Open shadow light presented a much softer scene and when combined with a shallow depth of field, it helped draw out a different character of the seed pods nested in fibrous greenery.

A bright afternoon and a parting of clouds brought the most intense color to the capsules. This cheerful image has been included in a 2011 calendar promoting Montana Photographers.

Persian Jewels 11x17 print

These photographs illustrate the reasoning behind the idea of studying your subject matter and how to utilize the elements of light to interpret what you record.

If you have any comments or thoughts about these images please let me know.

Related posts:

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/challenge-your-photographic-vision/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/water-the-meditation-of-liquid-music/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/fear-and-persistance-of-expression/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/sense-what-the-landscape-is-telling-you/

Photographs used in this post are copyrighted by Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography, 2010, All Rights Reserved. Reproduction in any manner is prohibited without the written permission of Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography. My image catalog can be viewed at http://www.rangeofvisionphotos.com. You can contact me through this blog or email at: wayne@rangeofvisionphotos.com

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Not being able to travel as much as I would like to seek out and photograph the big dramatic landscapes of the Rockies, I have begun focusing on more intimate scenes.

Discovering abstract patterns in nature’s details and then capturing that energy flow through the magic of light has become just as powerful and exciting for me.

In spending more garden time instead of mountain -time I’ve learned to be more observant, detailed and to move at a much slower pace. Less ground to cover and an excellent opportunity to watch the movement of light throughout the day.

You still use your vision and consciousness conceiving the image in thought and reacting to details, composition and patterns with emotion, capturing the moment. The process is just on a smaller scale.

Three new garden images are being released through my website gallery.

Bunny Tail grasses, blue forget me not flower

Summer Light

The first which is part of a series of images I am assembling on a decorative grass called Bunny Tails. This photograph came together with the very last warm reflective sun light of a summer’s day.

Summer Light”, has the added touch of a single blue forget me not flower that enhances the background tying both elements together creating depth. These were the only blooming plants in my yard when I set out to make an image.

Throughout the day I walked past the foot tall Bunnies swaying in the wind waiting for the moment of inspiration to grab me. Just before dusk they signaled they were ready. I saw a new composition and exposed for four different views as the sun sank below the horizon.

Beckworth Garden”, is an 8×24 inch panorama.

flower garden panorama yellow Black eyed Susan's

Beckworth Garden Panorama

Three times a growing season this family garden is awash with the radiant colors of thousands of tulips in spring then in summer poppies are blooming everywhere. Late summers’ Black-Eye Susan’s flowers were what brought our cameras out.  We rose before dawn and on location making exposures before any direct light greeted us.

Garden flowers, yellow black eyed susan's blooming

Black eyed Susan's

With “Black Eyed Susan’s” the challenge of making a simple composition was made more difficult with the use of only a wide angle lens. With thousands of blossoms filling the viewfinder directing attention to the scene’s essence was the object.

I previewed a shallow depth of field and used that setting range to explore the semi circle view of the garden we had access to.

The subtleties of morning light and the vibrant color tone of the flowers combined to convey different emotions from the same garden view.

Changing one’s perspective in the way we would normally approach a familiar subject to photograph inspires us with new ideas and refines our studies in light and composition. It gives us new directions for our vision.

Related posts:

http;//myphotovisions.wordpress.com/water-the-meditation-of-liquid-music/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/fear-and-persistance-of-expression/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/sense-what-the-landscape-is-telling-you/

Photographs used in this post are copyrighted by Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography, 2010, All Rights Reserved. Reproduction in any manner is prohibited without the written permission of Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography. My image catalog can be viewed at http://www.rangeofvisionphotos.com. You can contact me through this blog or email at: wayne@rangeofvisionphotos.com

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Water, the essence of life, its constant movement has always drawn my attention both in my search for spirituality, a catalyst for meditation, and as a means of creative expression through fine art photography.

I find there is something extremely soothing about water. Flowing water comes alive with a vibrancy that is gripping to ones soul, sparkling and dancing in a blur of movement and light.

Fluid water movement

Fluid - 11x17 Giclee watercolor print

Just as water has a lot of physical benefits to the body, it also has a lot of mental benefits when utilized in meditation.  Ever wonder why a person feels refreshed while standing near the ocean, a waterfall or a stream?

Besides how calming the sound of flowing water is, water produces negative ions. When near a cascading waterfall or stream these negative ions get absorbed into the bloodstream and we feel both calm and invigorated.

Feeling its peacefulness is what I want my images to portray.  I want viewers to close their eyes and take long deep breaths and feel refreshed. I want them to imagine the sounds that emanate from a flowing creek and trigger a sense of serenity into their subconscious.

Unlike my work in photojournalism, fine art photography, for me, is all about the pure pleasure of creating the image.

Custom giclee print, water movement, implied motion

Liquidity - 11x17 Giclee print

My approach is to interpret the mood of the waterfall, river or creek before I photograph it. A fast shutter speed freezes the movement and in a sense documents the action. Using a slower shutter speed begins to transform the mood with a more mystical feeling.

Those long multi second exposures present a scene with a silky flow and a more dreamlike sensation. Illustrating the point of view of what water meditation can convey to the psyche is part of the creative process in capturing the image.

Sometimes enhancing the color saturation of the rocks that lie under the water may best define your vision. Capturing bright specular highlights is another way to convey your feelings to the viewer. It is a personal matter of interpretation and creative vision.

Proper print display culminates your invitation to extend your private experience and share it with others. Water meditation exemplified through Giclee prints on watercolor paper can invoke calm, soothing feelings both for the mind and body. They can help bring about a feeling of well being while washing away stress. It is the whirl of the moment caught in an image that draws attention and captivates the viewer developing a meditative state.

Related posts:

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/fear-and-persistance-of-expression/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/sense-what-the-landscape-is-telling-you/

Photographs used in this post are copyrighted by Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography, 2010, All Rights Reserved. Reproduction in any manner is prohibited without the written permission of Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography. My image catalog can be viewed at http://www.rangeofvisionphotos.com. You can contact me through this blog or email at: wayne@rangeofvisionphotos.com

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There are times when I don’t seem to have, “the vision”, anymore and with this comes the depression that can plague you and drag you down with disbelief in your work and in yourself.

I have photographic skills. I’ve learned the trade with a degree in photojournalism, working for newspapers, freelancing to magazines and various book publishers. I learned enough to have expressed those skills through teaching photography at a University and since that time I gathered those proficiencies and had a twenty year run with my own publishing company.

floral color pallet abstract nature giclee print

Color Pallet - 11x17 Giclee Print

But just as the day I was mesmerized by the click of a shutter on my first camera many years ago, the excitement is sometimes followed by the anxiety and self judgment of myself and the success of the image.

Sometimes, I feel that I am just playing with the, “wanna be”, thoughts of being a photographer, even though I have been driven’ to the viewfinder almost all my life.

Now my work in fine art photography is more conceptualized, sometimes only seconds before it happens but it can flow freely.

I have learned that it is the process of making images that counts. It is what shapes us as artists. What happens with the final image is only important to the viewer. Our art is made through our private vision and the execution that gathered all the elements necessary to communicate this vision to another person.

abstract photograph garden gate

Garden Gate - 11x17 Giclee Print

I still get the anxiety rushes sometimes but I have learned to accept myself and in doing so my vision and art has grown.

The creation of images is always at work in one’s subconscious. We feed it through the action of doing. Reading, viewing other artwork, studying, adopting and applying what you like and works for you leads to your distinctive style. The work itself develops who we are.

I have taken and at times created tens of thousands of images over the years. Many others were thrown in the trash seconds after I saw the developed film or deleted after capture. Each of those images was an expression of who I was at that time.

floral abstract fine art photograph

Dreaming Bamboo - 11x17 Giclee Print

Unhappy times created mediocre photographs. Depressive times left me without expression. Eventually the desire to communicate lured me back and after each personal pitfall the quality of my art grew and the vision was easier to grasp the next time around.

My point here is that one must keep working developing new image after new image, trying one thing after another with a belief that a breakthrough will come. Believing in yourself is key yet it is the hardest hurdle to overcome in the making of one’s art and the discovery of who you are.

Sometimes it will take a hundred or more failed photos to pull yourself through but faith that the next plateau is out there and you can get to it will make you art soar.

It is not an easy task but to some the drive just will not let go.

Related post:

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/sense-what-the-landscape-is-telling-you/

Photographs used in this post are copyrighted by Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography, 2010, All Rights Reserved. Reproduction in any manner is prohibited without the written permission of Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography. My image catalog can be viewed at http://www.rangeofvisionphotos.com. You can contact me through this blog or email at: wayne@rangeofvisionphotos.com

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As a follow up to my last post,” Vision and Experimentation Creates Expression”, I wanted to make note of another photo session in an effort to push my thoughts on what makes a Fine Art Photography print and how to expand my interpretation of landscape images.

Driving back from Missoula to Bozeman, Montana last weekend I took a detour and drove the Pintler Scenic Route, MT Hwy 1. Through the Sapphire Mountains and along Georgetown Lake’s cobalt blue waters where the views were mostly pine forest and snow capped peaks.

I had photographed the area many times before when I was the publisher of a regional travel guide some years back.  It was the familiarity of the scene that was a problem for me. I didn’t want the same style landscape I already had in my stock files.

aspen grove abstract landscape image

Aspen Grove Abstract Giclee Print

In making a change from a photojournalist to fine art photographer I am always trying to leave behind a documentary style of communication to a more interpretive and personal one. I am always asking what if?

Among the tens of thousands of pine trees I found a small grove of aspens dressed in bright spring green color.  I have more than a dozen aspen grove images in all seasons. What could I do that would be different this time?

Walking along the road I felt the sense of movement of the aspens in my vision. How could I capture this feeling and compose it in the viewfinder?

Setting up my tripod I began panning across the trees. With a slow shutter speed of ¼ second I exposed a shot.  It just wasn’t the right motion.

I stood there and stared at the white bark surrounded by fluttering green leaves. Then the image came. A vertical pan or tilt with the same shutter speed.

It captured the mood I felt and it was visually different from my stock landscapes of aspens.

Experimenting, trying something a bit unorthodox is always a good thing. It doesn’t matter if the results work or not as an image that communicates. The point is that you try something different to make changes in your vision.

Expand awareness of your surroundings be in the moment and the images will reach out to you as connections are made.

Related Posts:

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2010/06/10/vision-and-experimentation-creates-expression/

 https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2010/03/22/twenty-minute-challenge-photograph-an-orchid/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2010/02/21/use-red-accent-photographs-to-capture-attention/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2010/1/12/what-can-orange-do-for-you?/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/11/17/purple-an-element-of-fire/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/09/11/can-color-photgraphs-enhance-positive-feelings-of-well-being?/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/09/28/photography-and-feng-shui-for-interior-design/

Photographs used in this post are copyrighted by Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography, 2010, All Rights Reserved. Reproduction in any manner is prohibited without the written permission of Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography. My image catalog can be viewed at http://www.rangeofvisionphotos.com. You can contact me through this blog or email at: wayne@rangeofvisionphotos.com

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Some people think that Daylilies and in particular the Stargazer Daylily are the most perfect perennial flower. With this in mind when I came across a few stems in the store the other day I couldn’t pass them up.

Their intoxicating fragrance alone made it worth the $3.99 I spent on them. A heavenly scent first filled my car and then my kitchen with its sweet and heady perfume. They are one of my favorites as well reminding me of the tropics.

Stargazer Lily

Stargazer - 11x17 Giclee Prnt

Remnants of this season’s winter snow was still in my yard, the soil was softening from Spring’s warm sun but still frozen just a few inches below the surface so nothing was growing or ready to photograph in my garden yet. So I opted for store bought to have something to work with.

Its unique graceful form and showy decorative value make Stargazers easy to photograph which in turn makes it harder to find the right angle and lighting scheme to depict something a little more unusual in composition.  You have got to put a personal touch on these things or your photographs look just like everyone else’s.

A slight turn of the stem to elongate a shadow or a raise in the tripod makes a difference.

Stargazer lily

Stargazer - 12x12 Giclee Print

In the art of Feng Shui both colors, red and pink, denote an expression of love but while red is more passionate, pink indicates lighter feelings of romance being more soothing to the heart as a color.

Stargazers, like all lilies, are native to Asia and are related to lily-of-the-valley, daylily and hyacinth. They all have an unforgettable scent with more than one hundred different species of lily alone.

In one of the images shown here as viewed from the front of the bloom, the flower segments tend to be long and pointed and their shape looks like a three or six-pointed star, hence their name.  The second image is a little more abstracted, closer to the stamens and utilizes shadow to create depth within the image.

This week I have noticed that little green shoots are popping up in the soil all around town. Another week and tulips and daffodils will be on parade in front of photographer’s lenses everywhere.

Related Posts:

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2010/03/22/twenty-minute-challenge-%e2%80%93-photograph-an-orchid/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2010/02/21/use-red-accent-photographs-to-capture-attention/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2010/1/12/what-can-orange-do-for-you?/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/11/17/purple-an-element-of-fire/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/09/11/can-color-photgraphs-enhance-positive-feelings-of-well-being?/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/09/28/photography-and-feng-shui-for-interior-design/

Photographs used in this post are copyrighted by Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography, 2010, All Rights Reserved. Reproduction in any manner is prohibited without the written permission of Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography. My image catalog can be viewed at http://www.rangeofvisionphotos.com. You can contact me through this blog or through email at: wayne@rangeofvisionphotos.com

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In my last post I wrote about how to find the proper safari guide and outfitter for your African adventure. Remember that is very important to find a properly sanctioned guide and get references from past clients before you make a reservation and commit to your travels. www.atta.travel – African Travel and Tourism Association.

With this post I want to give you an idea of what to do before you pack for your safari adventure.

Lions on safari

Range Rover with lions

Most people who have been on safari are eager to answer questions so when you seek out travelers it is good to have some questions in mind. The more specific inquiries you have regarding your particular trip the better.

The US dollar is the main travel currency in Africa. However, it is a good idea to know the exchange rates for the country you are headed to or passing through.

Some countries have an airport tax that is due before you can depart. Check with the airlines that you may be using to get specific information.

Always make copies of your passport and itinerary. Leave a set at home with someone you can contact if the need arises.  In addition always take a copy with you but keep them in a separate place just like you would some extra emergency cash.

Elephants in Manyara National Park, Tanzania

Crossing the road

Check with the US Embassy to see if there are any travel restrictions regarding the country or countries you plan to visit. The political world can change quickly in some places. www.usembassy.gov/ It is always a good idea to let the embassy know your travel plans for security.
http://travel.state.gov/travel/tips/tips_1232.html

Contact your destination country about any Visas you may need several months in advance of your trip in case there are problems. See your personal physician and secure any reentry medical documents regarding smallpox and hepatitis shots and medicine prescriptions like Malaria well in advance. For further information contact the US Department of Health and Human Services. http://www.hhs.gov/ .

Travel insurance isn’t a must but Safari businesses have been known to shut their doors without warning or if they do not book enough clients they may cancel the trip just as you are ready to depart. You may have an unforeseen problem and have to cancel yourself. You should at least check into travel insurance and weigh the logistics. www.TravelGuard.com/Compare

Check to see if you own health insurance will cover you if there were to be an accident or you are injured on location. Be sure it will cover an air extract from remote locations. You may be a long way away from a major airport or real hospital.

Lion cub on kopje rock island

Lion cub, Serengeti National Park

Electricity in Africa is 220-240V AC50HZ. You can obtain adapter plugs from companies like Magellan’s catalog online, www.magellans.com. They also have reliable travel gear and clothing. Travel Smith is another company that has safari gear and clothing. www.travelsmith.com.

Now, for some information about clothing tips and safari gear, it is important to note that while on a wildlife safari do not make the mistake of wearing bright colored clothes.  Safari clothing should be in neutral colors like light brown, khaki and darker green. For wildlife viewing you want to blend in.

To enhance your travel safari experience get yourself a language dictionary and learn some of the local words for better communication and showing an interest in the country’s culture. I did pick up English – Swahili pocket book for useful phrases and it did bring more smiles from locals. Just making an effort can mean a lot. www.taboraonline.com

The next post part 3 will finish with information on clothing, personal and camera gear to consider before you go on your safari.

Related posts:

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2010/04/03/how-to-prepare-for-an-african-safari/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/02/24/flamingos-baboons-and-a-bull-elephant/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/04/15/safari-notes-part-one/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/04/18/safari-notes-part-two/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/02/02/safari-road/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/02/02/horizon-of-stars/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2010/02/13/kopjes-rock-islands-for-lions/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/03/06/tree-climbing-lions 

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/02/02/tracking-lions 

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/02/02/elephant-brothers 

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/07/27/altered-images/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/05/24/zebras-and-wild-horses/

Photographs used in this post are copyrighted by Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography, 2010, All Rights Reserved. Reproduction in any manner is prohibited without the written permission of Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography. My image catalog can be viewed at http://www.rangeofvisionphotos.com. You can contact me through this blog or through email at: wayne@rangeofvisionphotos.com

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There are many weekends when I search the stores for nice looking floral specimens that have photographic potential. I try to keep working all through the winter months, attempting to stay in practice and keep whatever creative activity as a nature photographer I have in the forefront.

Sitting idle photographically during winter, it becomes harder to get into the swing of things when spring comes and new growth throughout the landscape shows its face.

I would imagine most nature photographers read, write and study on those cold days when the snow is piled high and the temperatures plummet. Some of us continue to find something interesting to explore in their viewfinders.

Oncidium Mendenhall Hildos Orchid

Oncidium Mendenhall Hildos Orchid 11x17 Giclee Print

So, anyway, I was in a flower shop and saw some exotic orchids that looked pretty interesting. Most of the time, you get to choose between a colorful Dendrobium and a choice Phalaenopsis.

Today, Cheryl, a master gardener and florist, introduced me to two new orchids I hadn’t seen before.  First, was a bright creamy yellow Brassia Verrucosa. They were spider like with long slender petals. Clustered blossoms were spread along a twenty inch stem.

The other orchid was an Oncidium hybrid called a Mendenhall Hildos. It had a single elongated flower with yellow-brown petals and three inch long antennae. This one had more of a flying alien appearance and it piqued my interest.

Cheryl the kind florist, offered to let me photograph the Oncidium. Excited, I raced back home and picked up my camera gear and returned in minutes.

It was busy in the store upon my return. Understandably, I did not seek to interfere with business but I wanted to use the occasion to photograph that Orchid.

Hybred Orchid Oncidium Hildos

Oncidium Hildos Hybred Orchid 11x17 Giclee Print

I had a small space against a bright glaring window about three feet from the glass. I put up a black piece of poster board for a backdrop and began to find a workable composition with the natural bright light. With only fifteen to twenty minutes to work with I acted fast.

It was almost like working as a photojournalist again. Think fast, know your equipment, previsualize and go for it.

With set up and six exposures I was dismantling on that twenty minute sweep of the hand on her clock.

It was an opportunity and challenge I had to take. It was fun. Best of all I made a new friend added another image to my portfolio and furthered the possibility of another photo session.

Next time I will hope for thirty minutes and see how that goes. The idea is to just keep practicing with every prospect.

Photographs used in this post are copyrighted by Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography, 2010, All Rights Reserved. Reproduction in any manner is prohibited without the written permission of Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography. My image catalog can be viewed at http://www.rangeofvisionphotos.com. You can contact me through this blog or through email at: wayne@rangeofvisionphotos.com

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I was looking down working on a set of ice pond abstracts trying to figure out how to approach this subject with my camera. I was up early, the morning light was good and it wasn’t very cold.  I searched for the design and compositional elements featuring close up conceptual images to come to me.

Nothing here, nothing there, I kept on walking around a five acre puddle laden parking lot. Head down, I scanned a dozen sheets of thin cracked ice. I felt frustrated. There had to be something worthwhile here.

nature abstract pond ice

Pond Ice 2 - 11x17 Giclee Print

Where was that Zen moment I needed? I know from experience if I am open, images will show themselves and allow my camera to capture their essence. Don’t rush this I thought. Breathe. Enjoy the space. The day is good.

I changed to a macro lens and did another turn around the lot looking deeper. Finally, some air bubbles beneath a delicate slip of ice caught my eye and while down on my knees I made a few exposures. A glance to the left and more possibilities appeared. Circles and lines with slight gradients of grey blue color began to stand out.

OK, this is better I thought. Keep up the observation.

Suddenly a piercing cry from the sky drew my attention. Looking up I saw two bald eagles. www.birdweb.org . They danced in the bright blue Montana sky playing tag on the wind. Circling each other, one flipped over and they locked talons, free falling several feet before they leveled off and continued their course south toward the Spanish Peaks and the Madison mountain range across the valley.

Nature abstract pond ice

Pond Ice 6 - 11x17 Giclee Print

I stood with an adrenalin rush awed by the wild sight I had just witnessed. I felt humbled by the rare event. It had me mesmerized with a broad grin until they flew off in the distance their white heads and tails disappearing, blending into the snowcapped peaks on the horizon.

What an honor!

These few momentous seconds gave me my nature connection. In an instant I felt centered. The spirits had touched me.

Returning to my down to earth visual task of pond ice photographs the invigorating experience refocused my awareness. New images began to flow. Now, those air bubble circles, icy streaks and muddy textures joined in my viewfinder all on their own. I became the conduit that tripped the shutter.

nature abstract pond ice

Pond Ice 5 - 11x17 Giclee Print

A successful morning effort added several new images to my nature abstract collection. I left the parking lot feeling high.

Two days later I was contacted by an online gallery with an invitation to join their selective artist’s family, www.discoveredartists.com.  They reviewed work from my web site and asked me to submit nature abstracts to market and feature on their site. My reward was complete.

The positive effects of being open and making an effort to pursue my art continues to drive my creativity and strengthen my beliefs.

Related posts of interest:

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2010/02/07/winter-hunt-on-peach-street/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/12/10/final-fall-visuals-to-keep-the-focus-on-creative-photography/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/11/11/no-fall-color-only-seed-pods-to-photograph/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/08/27/seeing-with-a-beginners-mind/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/08/20/water-speaking-water/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/07/19/winter-windows/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/02/02/river-shaman/

Photographs used in this post are copyrighted by Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography, 2010, All Rights Reserved. Reproduction in any manner is prohibited without the written permission of Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography. My image catalog can be viewed at http://www.rangeofvisionphotos.com. You can contact me through this blog or through email at: wayne@rangeofvisionphotos.com

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Fire is what I associate with the color red. First thoughts that come to mind are the flames and lava flows connected with the Hawaiian goddess Pele whose fiery red spirit streams throughout the Islands.

The image illustrated in this post was an interpretive expression observed during a hula festival on Maui. A slow shutter speed combined with panning the camera gave me a portrait of implied motion and imaginary flames of red lava that merged into the female dancers’ facial expression. It became a meaningful image both of the ancient kuhiko hula and the passion of the islands.

Hawaiian goddess Pele

Hawaiian goddess Pele 12x12 Giclee Print

To capture such a fluid vibrant red in a photograph and present it as a fine art photographic collector print illustrates what this medium can do for décor in interior design.

Today photography has become an integral part of home and office décor.

Combined with other memorable artwork such as a painting or wall sculpture, photography shows off your specific tastes. Fine art photographic prints can be reproduced on canvas, digital or watercolor sub-strata and can make your living /work space comfortable and singular to you personally.

Besides heat and fire, red, used as an accent color, symbolizes other positive connotations such as courage, purity, sexuality and beauty. It catches a viewer’s attention and carries the strongest reaction of all the colors in the visible spectrum.

Having a piece of original photographic artwork on display has an equal visual value to oil and watercolor paintings. They are generally more affordable and easier for viewers to associate with.

Using the color red as an accent can radiate energy and strong emotions.

Obviously you do not need to have a depiction of a Hawaiian goddess on your wall to evoke a heated reaction from viewers. When you use red or its various shades as wall décor imagery draw on ideas that are meaningful to you.

Red Tulips

Shimmer - 11x17 Giclee Print

Try utilizing a beautiful red sunset from your travels or perhaps a close up image from a floral garden that is compatible to your personality. The subject matter is entirely up to you. That is what is enticing about fine art photography. There is an endless supply of themes to focus upon weather from nature or man-made topics.

It is all about what strikes your fancy and how you interpret your design and layout scheme. This is what is so great about high quality fine art photographic prints. You have an excellent choice in subjects as well as how you mount and matte your prints for display. You have a greater opportunity to show off your individuality with an endless supply of alternatives.

Related Posts:

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2010/1/12/what-can-orange-do-for-you?/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/11/17/purple-an-element-of-fire/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/09/11/can-color-photgraphs-enhance-positive-feelings-of-well-being?/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/09/28/photography-and-feng-shui-for-interior-design/

Photographs used in this post are copyrighted by Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography, 2010, All Rights Reserved. Reproduction in any manner is prohibited without the written permission of Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography. My image catalog can be viewed at http://www.rangeofvisionphotos.com. You can contact me through this blog or through email at: wayne@rangeofvisionphotos.com

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 Crater Floor Discoveries

We had just circled Lake Magadi in the Ngorongoro Conservation Area of Northern Tanzania. We observed and photographed both the greater and lesser Pink Flamingos. Countless long legged beauties were feeding in the shallow alkaline waters.

From a distance the lake appeared tinted pink and as we got to the shoreline it seemed half the lake was filled with flamingos chattering away, high stepping in the salty shallows.

flamingoes-lake-magadi

Lake Magadi Flamingoes

Spoonbills also love these area marshes and swamps. Their dazzling white plumage with bright red, unfettered faces are very distinctive. Large spoon shaped pink bills are used in a continuous sweeping motion that churns up the lake bottom as they nibble down the days’ dinner.

Both Flamingos and Spoonbills frequent the freshwater and alkaline lakes all along the Great Rift Valley. A quarter mile away we could hear their chattering. Closer, with a 200mm lens, I photographed thousands of these striking birds.

flamingoes

Flamingoes

A jackal brazenly walked right along the shoreline appearing to make a meal choice for his days’ feed.  Greater Flamingos raced across the water their colorful bodies lifted into the air, flying perhaps thirty yards before splashing back down into the overwhelming crowd of pink and white bodies. The jackal backed off. With so many birds I guess he just couldn’t make up his mind. Safety in numbers prevailed.

Just beyond Lake Magadi, nestled along the crater wall, is the Lerai forest. I thought this was the prettiest part of the caldera. Hugh yellow barked acacia, flat topped acacia wild mango and croton trees canopy the whole area. The cooler shade was a welcomed respite from intense sunshine.

We pulled to a stop just when a noisy pack of Baboons came charging toward the Land Cruiser.  Babies clung to their mothers backs hanging on for dear life as they ran across the red dirt road. Some kind of personal conflict raged through the troop. High pitched screams and barks filled the air. It was the sound of the terrified.

baboon-w-young

Baboon with baby

My motor drive whirred away and before I realized it we were surrounded by Baboons. They climbed up the backside of the Cruiser grabbing at my camera bag then at me.

Nyani, Swahili for Baboon can get up to 100 pounds and are very crafty. Dropping my camera bag into the vehicle I kept on photographing these olive brown aggressive characters.

Each time I swung around they backed off a bit startled by my sudden movements. They started eating the rubber gaskets on the sunroof. I shot close up portraits until I couldn’t focus any closer.

baboon-eating-gasket

Rubber eater

A loud snap and crash filled the air. All of the Baboons scattered in an instant seeking shelter in the woodlands, screaming at the top of their lungs all the way.

That shattering sound was followed by a bull elephant’s bellow. I swung around just in time to photograph this massive creature charging us. He kicked up red dust, ears flapping wide and trunk arched forward.

bull-elephant

Before I knew it I was eye to eye with gleaming white tusks within reach. Again this animal was closer than I could focus with my 80-200mm lens.

My driver quickly pulled forward and the bull backed off from his charge. We hooped and howled from the adrenaline surge and I added another memorable moment to my African safari.

 Related Post:

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/02/02/tracking-lions

All photographs are copyrighted by Wayne Scherr, 2009, All Rights Reserved. Reproduction is prohibited without the written permission of Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photos. My image gallery can be viewed at www.rangeofvisionphotos.com or you can contact me through this blog or email: wayne@rangeofvisionphotos.com

 

 

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