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Archive for the ‘Garden Flowers’ Category

Mindful Moments, the fifth publication from Wayne Scherr and Range of Vision Photography has been published and is now offered to the public for viewing and purchase. Mindful Moments is a collection of images is a cross section of imagery that ranges from the mountain landscapes of Glacier National Park to garden florals water movement and abstract photographs. All are from my home in Montana.

Mystery Creek cover for Mindful Moments

Mystery Creek cover for Mindful Moments

From the introduction:
It was the weathered wood fence and floral garden beyond at my brother’s home that defined Mindful Moments for me. This was where photographic images offered themselves to my camera and opened my heart.
Together as photographers we have discovered brief seconds of light that sculpt the natural world and in the creative process developed connections that define one’s life.
Mindful Moments have since shadowed my footsteps as I focus on broader landscapes and experimental visions. It is with great respect for the encouragement and support of my brother, Greg, that I offer these images to the viewer in hopes that sharing them will transcend my experiences into a greater awareness of thought and be moved by these, visual, Mindful Moments.
120 pages illustrated with 99 photographs
Standard landscape format 10 x 8 inches (25 x 20 cm) with soft cover $37.95
To preview and purchase your copy of Mindful Moments, go to

 

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/abstract-from-a-land-of-landscapes/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/challenge-your-photographic-vision/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/water-the-meditation-of-liquid-music/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/fear-and-persistance-of-expression/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/sense-what-the-landscape-is-telling-you/

Photographs used in this post are copyrighted by Wayne Scherr,
Range of Vision Photography, 2012, All Rights Reserved. Reproduction in any
manner is prohibited without the written permission of Wayne Scherr, Range of
Vision Photography. My image catalog can be viewed at http://www.rangeofvisionphotos.com.

You can contact me through this blog or email at: wayne@rangeofvisionphotos.com

 

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In Photography with the capture of form, texture and color, we
depict what we perceive as real and meld it into a more fantasy style of illustration.
This is called an abstract.

The visual connection between the subject and viewer is formed by
the viewer’s imagination, perception and experiences. Their insight transcends
the visual elements of the image in the communication process.

Storm on the Horizon is actually moving water
rushing over colorful rocks in an alpine mountain stream high in the Absaroka
Beartooth Wilderness of Montana. I used a timed exposure of three seconds and
this implied the motion I wanted to convey. Depth was created by the horizontal
lines of surging water and specular highlights it picked up in the foreground.

Photographic abstract water movement

Storm on the Horizon

Incorporating a second layer of flowing water gave the composition
added depth and movement developing a translucent curtain above the underlying
streambed. This gave the image a windswept driving rain illusion. Perhaps a
hurricane or tropical storm in thought.

During post processing, using Photoshop, I enhanced color
saturation in the submerged rocks focusing on the red hues. I felt this gave
life to the image with an almost sunset feeling.

So what do you perceive when viewing this photograph, a sunset? Is
this a storm front on the ocean? Does it matter what the photographer saw or
thought he saw when composing in the viewfinder? Is it up to the viewer and
their experiences that actually determine the final communication between the
image, viewer and photographer?

Forget me not – In this floral abstract photograph I went for
the color effect of bright blue for its visual appeal.

abstract photograph blue florals

Forget me nots

Over the last few summers I have tried to depict Forget- me -not
flowers in a direct way. I have used them as background splashes of color,
as distinctive out of focus bokeh (boquet) successfully but when isolating them
as a single documentary image it just didn’t work the way I envisioned.

Earlier this season I worked with panning the camera during
exposures, especially on trees, and was happy with the results. When these
brilliant sky blue flowers blanketed the garden midsummer I thought of this
technique again and used it to capture the color and texture of this ground
cover.

In order to slow the shutter speed to convey this style of motion
I added a polarizing filter to my wide angle lens and shot a series of one
quarter to one half second exposures. With the shutter open I panned the
camera, while attached to a tripod, and liked the results.

In post processing, again, I utilized Photoshop to enhance the
blue hues resulting in a dynamic color abstract photograph.

When photographing abstracts you have to kind of forget what your
subject matter really is, and be open to different uses of lenses, camera
settings and post processing techniques.

Imagination plays the most important role in determining the final
results of the finished print. Think in terms of shapes, textures and color
combining them to make a unique image that is not what it is but what your
imagination sees.

Related Posts:

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/challenge-your-photographic-vision/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/water-the-meditation-of-liquid-music/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/fear-and-persistance-of-expression/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/sense-what-the-landscape-is-telling-you/

Photographs used in this post are copyrighted by Wayne Scherr,
Range of Vision Photography, 2010, All Rights Reserved. Reproduction in any
manner is prohibited without the written permission of Wayne Scherr, Range of
Vision Photography. My image catalog can be viewed at http://www.rangeofvisionphotos.com.

You can contact me through this blog or email at: wayne@rangeofvisionphotos.com

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Been working on a rebuild and design of my website http://www.rangeofvisionphotos.com for several weeks now and finally after some trouble shooting this weekend and a long phone call into my host server have things up and running.

I have changed some of the galleries deleting some older images and collections. Along with the update I have added a special gallery. It is one that highlights water and movement featuring the magical flow and energies that only water can provide to the viewer.

I particularly like the images entitled Breaking Through, River Shaman and Water Spirits. Each is very distinct and emote a unique connection with the spiritual side of nature and my interpretation.

Water Movement - Breaking Through

11x17 Reproduction entitled Breaking Through

The abstract collection contains many new images and in particular I like Planetary Storm, Signs and Quaking Aspens. They have a tendency to create thought provoking conversations with Storm and Signs being close ups of ice and the Aspens a dreamy blur of implied motion.

In the Panorama Collection both the Garden Panorama and Color Pallet are new and very different in image presentation. Color Pallet is an abstract interpretation of the Garden pan image location.

Included in the Landscape collection are photographs from Montana, Idaho, Hawaii and Utah. All are intriguing locations to enjoy and contemplate their distinctive settings. Twin Lakes and Honopu Valley are awe inspiring sites.

Abstract interpretation Quaking Aspens

11x17 Reproduction - Quaking Aspens

My Floral Collection is the most extensive with numerous possibilities of picture pairs and sets that can be combined for outstanding wall décor and layouts with everything from Bunny Tails and Dahlias to Orchids and tulips. Jewels and Floral Harmony have recently appeared in calendars showcasing Montana Photographers.

So I invite readers of this Blog to visit my website: www.rangeofvisionphotos.com  and I hope you find something of interest and stimulation to your senses.

You will also find connections to two books that I published since December. Range of Vision – Discovering the Magic of the Present Moment and Horizon of Stars – A Photographic Journal of an African Safari.

Layouts on a third publication entitled Edge of Heaven – A Photo Essay on Hawaii is in the works and should be available in April/May.

All photographs used in this entry are copyrighted by Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography, 2011, All Rights Reserved. Reproduction of any kind is prohibited. If you wish reproduction rights please contact: wayne@rangeofvisionphotos.com

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Out of curiosity and in an effort to continue forward movement regarding my creative efforts  I have been doing a little research and decided to learn some new technology regarding HDR photography.

HDR or High Dynamic Range photography is a post processing activity that combines a number of images with different contrast ratios that are unfeasible to complete with just one exposure. Usually you take three photos of the same scene at different shutter speeds and then combine them into one image. I have also tried this simply by bracketing, adjusting the exposure settings to plus one stop your normal exposure and minus one stop.

So you get three images, one overexposed, one for midtones and then one underexposed.  These are combined with software, I used Photoshop CS3. This process gives you details in both highlights and shadows that are joined with the medium or normal exposure giving you results that seem to be more accurate to what your eyes actually perceived at the scene.

What I found in working out the process is that it can work great for some images and not so much for others. My first attempts looked fake and artificial. The colors were exaggerated to the point that the scenic landscape I was working on looked gaudy.

However, when the HDR process really worked the image was much more suggestive of what I actually saw when I tripped the shutter on location. Shadow details were crisp and clear and the highlight information was bright and smooth. The final print represented what was much closer to actually being there and what I saw.

I have included a couple of examples of what I found in this post for your review.

Blackeyed Susans

Normal range image - Blackeyed Susans

HDR Blackeyed Susans

High Dynamic Range image - Blackeyed Susans

There are many HDR software applications out there along with numerous books and
Elephant Brothers

Normal range image - Elephant Brothers

tutorials on how to apply the process. Like most things this is just another tool that you can

HDR photograph - Elephant Brothers

High Dynamic Range image - Elephant Brothers

apply to your visual interpretations. It is always good to learn and experiment.  See what works for your style of photography.

I like the distinguishing details HDR portrays and as long as the colors are not overstated I’ll continue to have this method in my arsenal and use it to interpret different scenes and express my creativity. I encourage you to take a look at the HDR practice. It is definitely worth the time and effort.

All photographs used in this entry are copyrighted by Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography, 2011, All Rights Reserved. Reproduction of any kind is prohibited. If you wish reproduction rights please contact: wayne@rangeofvisionphotos.com

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Range of Vision – Discovering the Magic of the Present Moment

New Book by Wayne Scherr

Range of Vision is a photographic portfolio by Fine Art Photographer and Photojournalist Wayne Scherr.   Based in Montana, Wayne’s images presented in this book are a selection of nature photographs made in pursuit of self discovery and expression.

The Still Point is at the heart of the creative process. To be “Still” or “In the Moment” means to empty your psyche from the incessant flow of thoughts and create a state of consciousness that is open and receptive to your surroundings.

The Range of Vision portrayed in this full color book conveys a meditative approach to the design elements of  implied motion and movement of falling water, creeks and streams and features garden florals and interpretive abstracts.

80 pages illustrated with 87 photographs.

Standard landscape format 10 x 8 inches (25 x 20 cm) with soft cover $37.95

To preview and purchase your copy of Range of Vision , go to

http://www.blurb.com/books/1877388

Black-eyed Susans, garden image

Black-eyed Susans

 

Web site: http://www.rangeofvisionphotos.com

Blog: www.myphotovisions.wordpress.com

Contact: wayne@rangeofvisionphotos.com

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Entering my brother’s garden, I already knew that I was too late in the season to photograph the Persian Jewel flowers he previously recorded, but I didn’t expect the inflated seed pods to be so bright and colorful, like the blossoms were.

Snaking through several raised multicolored plant beds full of hundreds of blossoms with my tripod held high, there they were, crowding out an old weathered wood trough about five feet long and seven inches wide. They looked like a mini hedge of little gem-colored aliens, with ferny feelers reaching out into the surrounding air.

Jeweled Capsules - 12x 12 print

Persian Jewels are also known as Wild Fennel and by the Botanical name of Nigella damaascena. The flowers themselves are a bright mixture of saturated shades of mauve, light blue and white, lavender, purple, rose. They are excellent annual flower garden plants belonging to the buttercup family (Ranunculaceae).

But as they presented their balloon shaped seed pods to the camera this morning it was just as exciting as any floral display because it was so unexpected.

We photographed the Jewels at different time of the day portraying at least three unique interpretations. Early morning just after sunrise direct backlight added to the gem quality by catching highlights off the dew.

flowers, seed pods, persian jewels

Persian Jewels seed pods 11x17 print

A white reflector was used to fill light into the shadows of the pods which then gave some emphasis to the veins and lines in the capsules’ skin.

Open shadow light presented a much softer scene and when combined with a shallow depth of field, it helped draw out a different character of the seed pods nested in fibrous greenery.

A bright afternoon and a parting of clouds brought the most intense color to the capsules. This cheerful image has been included in a 2011 calendar promoting Montana Photographers.

Persian Jewels 11x17 print

These photographs illustrate the reasoning behind the idea of studying your subject matter and how to utilize the elements of light to interpret what you record.

If you have any comments or thoughts about these images please let me know.

Related posts:

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/challenge-your-photographic-vision/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/water-the-meditation-of-liquid-music/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/fear-and-persistance-of-expression/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/sense-what-the-landscape-is-telling-you/

Photographs used in this post are copyrighted by Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography, 2010, All Rights Reserved. Reproduction in any manner is prohibited without the written permission of Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography. My image catalog can be viewed at http://www.rangeofvisionphotos.com. You can contact me through this blog or email at: wayne@rangeofvisionphotos.com

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Not being able to travel as much as I would like to seek out and photograph the big dramatic landscapes of the Rockies, I have begun focusing on more intimate scenes.

Discovering abstract patterns in nature’s details and then capturing that energy flow through the magic of light has become just as powerful and exciting for me.

In spending more garden time instead of mountain -time I’ve learned to be more observant, detailed and to move at a much slower pace. Less ground to cover and an excellent opportunity to watch the movement of light throughout the day.

You still use your vision and consciousness conceiving the image in thought and reacting to details, composition and patterns with emotion, capturing the moment. The process is just on a smaller scale.

Three new garden images are being released through my website gallery.

Bunny Tail grasses, blue forget me not flower

Summer Light

The first which is part of a series of images I am assembling on a decorative grass called Bunny Tails. This photograph came together with the very last warm reflective sun light of a summer’s day.

Summer Light”, has the added touch of a single blue forget me not flower that enhances the background tying both elements together creating depth. These were the only blooming plants in my yard when I set out to make an image.

Throughout the day I walked past the foot tall Bunnies swaying in the wind waiting for the moment of inspiration to grab me. Just before dusk they signaled they were ready. I saw a new composition and exposed for four different views as the sun sank below the horizon.

Beckworth Garden”, is an 8×24 inch panorama.

flower garden panorama yellow Black eyed Susan's

Beckworth Garden Panorama

Three times a growing season this family garden is awash with the radiant colors of thousands of tulips in spring then in summer poppies are blooming everywhere. Late summers’ Black-Eye Susan’s flowers were what brought our cameras out.  We rose before dawn and on location making exposures before any direct light greeted us.

Garden flowers, yellow black eyed susan's blooming

Black eyed Susan's

With “Black Eyed Susan’s” the challenge of making a simple composition was made more difficult with the use of only a wide angle lens. With thousands of blossoms filling the viewfinder directing attention to the scene’s essence was the object.

I previewed a shallow depth of field and used that setting range to explore the semi circle view of the garden we had access to.

The subtleties of morning light and the vibrant color tone of the flowers combined to convey different emotions from the same garden view.

Changing one’s perspective in the way we would normally approach a familiar subject to photograph inspires us with new ideas and refines our studies in light and composition. It gives us new directions for our vision.

Related posts:

http;//myphotovisions.wordpress.com/water-the-meditation-of-liquid-music/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/fear-and-persistance-of-expression/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/sense-what-the-landscape-is-telling-you/

Photographs used in this post are copyrighted by Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography, 2010, All Rights Reserved. Reproduction in any manner is prohibited without the written permission of Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography. My image catalog can be viewed at http://www.rangeofvisionphotos.com. You can contact me through this blog or email at: wayne@rangeofvisionphotos.com

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There are times when I don’t seem to have, “the vision”, anymore and with this comes the depression that can plague you and drag you down with disbelief in your work and in yourself.

I have photographic skills. I’ve learned the trade with a degree in photojournalism, working for newspapers, freelancing to magazines and various book publishers. I learned enough to have expressed those skills through teaching photography at a University and since that time I gathered those proficiencies and had a twenty year run with my own publishing company.

floral color pallet abstract nature giclee print

Color Pallet - 11x17 Giclee Print

But just as the day I was mesmerized by the click of a shutter on my first camera many years ago, the excitement is sometimes followed by the anxiety and self judgment of myself and the success of the image.

Sometimes, I feel that I am just playing with the, “wanna be”, thoughts of being a photographer, even though I have been driven’ to the viewfinder almost all my life.

Now my work in fine art photography is more conceptualized, sometimes only seconds before it happens but it can flow freely.

I have learned that it is the process of making images that counts. It is what shapes us as artists. What happens with the final image is only important to the viewer. Our art is made through our private vision and the execution that gathered all the elements necessary to communicate this vision to another person.

abstract photograph garden gate

Garden Gate - 11x17 Giclee Print

I still get the anxiety rushes sometimes but I have learned to accept myself and in doing so my vision and art has grown.

The creation of images is always at work in one’s subconscious. We feed it through the action of doing. Reading, viewing other artwork, studying, adopting and applying what you like and works for you leads to your distinctive style. The work itself develops who we are.

I have taken and at times created tens of thousands of images over the years. Many others were thrown in the trash seconds after I saw the developed film or deleted after capture. Each of those images was an expression of who I was at that time.

floral abstract fine art photograph

Dreaming Bamboo - 11x17 Giclee Print

Unhappy times created mediocre photographs. Depressive times left me without expression. Eventually the desire to communicate lured me back and after each personal pitfall the quality of my art grew and the vision was easier to grasp the next time around.

My point here is that one must keep working developing new image after new image, trying one thing after another with a belief that a breakthrough will come. Believing in yourself is key yet it is the hardest hurdle to overcome in the making of one’s art and the discovery of who you are.

Sometimes it will take a hundred or more failed photos to pull yourself through but faith that the next plateau is out there and you can get to it will make you art soar.

It is not an easy task but to some the drive just will not let go.

Related post:

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/sense-what-the-landscape-is-telling-you/

Photographs used in this post are copyrighted by Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography, 2010, All Rights Reserved. Reproduction in any manner is prohibited without the written permission of Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography. My image catalog can be viewed at http://www.rangeofvisionphotos.com. You can contact me through this blog or email at: wayne@rangeofvisionphotos.com

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Some people think that Daylilies and in particular the Stargazer Daylily are the most perfect perennial flower. With this in mind when I came across a few stems in the store the other day I couldn’t pass them up.

Their intoxicating fragrance alone made it worth the $3.99 I spent on them. A heavenly scent first filled my car and then my kitchen with its sweet and heady perfume. They are one of my favorites as well reminding me of the tropics.

Stargazer Lily

Stargazer - 11x17 Giclee Prnt

Remnants of this season’s winter snow was still in my yard, the soil was softening from Spring’s warm sun but still frozen just a few inches below the surface so nothing was growing or ready to photograph in my garden yet. So I opted for store bought to have something to work with.

Its unique graceful form and showy decorative value make Stargazers easy to photograph which in turn makes it harder to find the right angle and lighting scheme to depict something a little more unusual in composition.  You have got to put a personal touch on these things or your photographs look just like everyone else’s.

A slight turn of the stem to elongate a shadow or a raise in the tripod makes a difference.

Stargazer lily

Stargazer - 12x12 Giclee Print

In the art of Feng Shui both colors, red and pink, denote an expression of love but while red is more passionate, pink indicates lighter feelings of romance being more soothing to the heart as a color.

Stargazers, like all lilies, are native to Asia and are related to lily-of-the-valley, daylily and hyacinth. They all have an unforgettable scent with more than one hundred different species of lily alone.

In one of the images shown here as viewed from the front of the bloom, the flower segments tend to be long and pointed and their shape looks like a three or six-pointed star, hence their name.  The second image is a little more abstracted, closer to the stamens and utilizes shadow to create depth within the image.

This week I have noticed that little green shoots are popping up in the soil all around town. Another week and tulips and daffodils will be on parade in front of photographer’s lenses everywhere.

Related Posts:

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2010/03/22/twenty-minute-challenge-%e2%80%93-photograph-an-orchid/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2010/02/21/use-red-accent-photographs-to-capture-attention/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2010/1/12/what-can-orange-do-for-you?/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/11/17/purple-an-element-of-fire/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/09/11/can-color-photgraphs-enhance-positive-feelings-of-well-being?/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/09/28/photography-and-feng-shui-for-interior-design/

Photographs used in this post are copyrighted by Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography, 2010, All Rights Reserved. Reproduction in any manner is prohibited without the written permission of Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography. My image catalog can be viewed at http://www.rangeofvisionphotos.com. You can contact me through this blog or through email at: wayne@rangeofvisionphotos.com

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There are many weekends when I search the stores for nice looking floral specimens that have photographic potential. I try to keep working all through the winter months, attempting to stay in practice and keep whatever creative activity as a nature photographer I have in the forefront.

Sitting idle photographically during winter, it becomes harder to get into the swing of things when spring comes and new growth throughout the landscape shows its face.

I would imagine most nature photographers read, write and study on those cold days when the snow is piled high and the temperatures plummet. Some of us continue to find something interesting to explore in their viewfinders.

Oncidium Mendenhall Hildos Orchid

Oncidium Mendenhall Hildos Orchid 11x17 Giclee Print

So, anyway, I was in a flower shop and saw some exotic orchids that looked pretty interesting. Most of the time, you get to choose between a colorful Dendrobium and a choice Phalaenopsis.

Today, Cheryl, a master gardener and florist, introduced me to two new orchids I hadn’t seen before.  First, was a bright creamy yellow Brassia Verrucosa. They were spider like with long slender petals. Clustered blossoms were spread along a twenty inch stem.

The other orchid was an Oncidium hybrid called a Mendenhall Hildos. It had a single elongated flower with yellow-brown petals and three inch long antennae. This one had more of a flying alien appearance and it piqued my interest.

Cheryl the kind florist, offered to let me photograph the Oncidium. Excited, I raced back home and picked up my camera gear and returned in minutes.

It was busy in the store upon my return. Understandably, I did not seek to interfere with business but I wanted to use the occasion to photograph that Orchid.

Hybred Orchid Oncidium Hildos

Oncidium Hildos Hybred Orchid 11x17 Giclee Print

I had a small space against a bright glaring window about three feet from the glass. I put up a black piece of poster board for a backdrop and began to find a workable composition with the natural bright light. With only fifteen to twenty minutes to work with I acted fast.

It was almost like working as a photojournalist again. Think fast, know your equipment, previsualize and go for it.

With set up and six exposures I was dismantling on that twenty minute sweep of the hand on her clock.

It was an opportunity and challenge I had to take. It was fun. Best of all I made a new friend added another image to my portfolio and furthered the possibility of another photo session.

Next time I will hope for thirty minutes and see how that goes. The idea is to just keep practicing with every prospect.

Photographs used in this post are copyrighted by Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography, 2010, All Rights Reserved. Reproduction in any manner is prohibited without the written permission of Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography. My image catalog can be viewed at http://www.rangeofvisionphotos.com. You can contact me through this blog or through email at: wayne@rangeofvisionphotos.com

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Fire is what I associate with the color red. First thoughts that come to mind are the flames and lava flows connected with the Hawaiian goddess Pele whose fiery red spirit streams throughout the Islands.

The image illustrated in this post was an interpretive expression observed during a hula festival on Maui. A slow shutter speed combined with panning the camera gave me a portrait of implied motion and imaginary flames of red lava that merged into the female dancers’ facial expression. It became a meaningful image both of the ancient kuhiko hula and the passion of the islands.

Hawaiian goddess Pele

Hawaiian goddess Pele 12x12 Giclee Print

To capture such a fluid vibrant red in a photograph and present it as a fine art photographic collector print illustrates what this medium can do for décor in interior design.

Today photography has become an integral part of home and office décor.

Combined with other memorable artwork such as a painting or wall sculpture, photography shows off your specific tastes. Fine art photographic prints can be reproduced on canvas, digital or watercolor sub-strata and can make your living /work space comfortable and singular to you personally.

Besides heat and fire, red, used as an accent color, symbolizes other positive connotations such as courage, purity, sexuality and beauty. It catches a viewer’s attention and carries the strongest reaction of all the colors in the visible spectrum.

Having a piece of original photographic artwork on display has an equal visual value to oil and watercolor paintings. They are generally more affordable and easier for viewers to associate with.

Using the color red as an accent can radiate energy and strong emotions.

Obviously you do not need to have a depiction of a Hawaiian goddess on your wall to evoke a heated reaction from viewers. When you use red or its various shades as wall décor imagery draw on ideas that are meaningful to you.

Red Tulips

Shimmer - 11x17 Giclee Print

Try utilizing a beautiful red sunset from your travels or perhaps a close up image from a floral garden that is compatible to your personality. The subject matter is entirely up to you. That is what is enticing about fine art photography. There is an endless supply of themes to focus upon weather from nature or man-made topics.

It is all about what strikes your fancy and how you interpret your design and layout scheme. This is what is so great about high quality fine art photographic prints. You have an excellent choice in subjects as well as how you mount and matte your prints for display. You have a greater opportunity to show off your individuality with an endless supply of alternatives.

Related Posts:

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2010/1/12/what-can-orange-do-for-you?/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/11/17/purple-an-element-of-fire/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/09/11/can-color-photgraphs-enhance-positive-feelings-of-well-being?/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/09/28/photography-and-feng-shui-for-interior-design/

Photographs used in this post are copyrighted by Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography, 2010, All Rights Reserved. Reproduction in any manner is prohibited without the written permission of Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography. My image catalog can be viewed at http://www.rangeofvisionphotos.com. You can contact me through this blog or through email at: wayne@rangeofvisionphotos.com

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When walking into a healthcare environment what is it that strikes you first? What do your senses evaluate as you make your way to the reception or waiting area?

Are the walls blank and lights harsh?

To most people first impressions say a lot about the care they perceive they will get. Institutional colors and windowless waiting rooms don’t convey care and healing.

Hawaiian King Protea

King Protea 11x17 print

Current studies indicate that healthcare providers can enhance their space and use it as part of their healing efforts by incorporating softer design elements. This creates a feeling of wellness and the perception of quality care.

The healing process has a place for both high tech and a calming human factor. Natural lighting, non canned music, plants and the introduction of quality, aesthetically pleasing photographic prints diminish the clinical feeling. In the Art of Feng Shui, nature images actually can aid the healing process with less stress.

Healing tones of nature can captivate and ease one into a state of relaxation. Familiar scenes like non representational landscapes and floral displays create a soothing ambiance. This in turn has a significant impact to one’s response to medical procedures. Nature prints can slow the heart rate and blood pressure reducing anxiety and tension levels.

Hawaiian Red Proteas

Red Proteas 11x17 print

Using nature imagery as a focal point can make someone feel that time passes more quickly as they get lost in the visual presentation. Positive distractions such as waterfalls, creeks and rivers tend to be positive and reduce muscle tension as viewers drift away into new settings.

Other soft images like rolling landscapes and garden settings that use healing colors and earth tones are also a good source to captivate one’s attention.

In the psychology of color use and the Art of Feng Shui healing the following guide is a suggestion in determining what to display to create a healing atmosphere.

Hawaiian Yellow Proteas

Yellow Proteas 11x17 print

Pink is the color of healing. It is associated with a sense of self-awareness.

Orange can induce tranquility and calmness.

Purple supports mental and physical healing. It has a meditative disposition. 

A color associated with insight and joy is Yellow. This bright color can help lift your mood and enhance a feeling of well being, like the effect of a sunny day.

White promotes love and relationships. It is associated with purity and confidence. Used with gold and silver it generates feelings of calmness. Since white blends with all colors it promotes harmony.

Large uninterrupted areas of white can impart feelings of sterility and starkness. It should be used with caution.

Blue is another calm and soothing color that reflects love and aids in bringing about healing and relaxation. Blue encourages feelings of trust and peace. Blue can promote a mindful, meditative state.

A restful color that supports balance, relief of pain and healing is Green. It can aid in relieving tension and lower blood pressure generating a sense of warmth. All the many shades of green in nature represent regeneration and harmony on an emotional level.

In addition to green, Brown is the most soothing color of nature. Brown evokes a sense of security.

Commonly, abstract images that have sharp angles or make use of intense glaring colors are not very useful for healing practice. Some people can become agitated or confused having to interpret such a photograph. It can create a sense of anxiety for them.

Fine art nature photography can present a very positive energy distraction when displayed in healing environments.

This theme of incorporating nature indoors through photography supports a comfortable ambience not just in health care facilities but also in your home, work place, conference rooms and public spaces in general.

Related Posts:

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2010/1/12/what-can-orange-do-for-you?/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/11/17/purple-an-element-of-fire/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/09/11/can-color-photgraphs-enhance-positive-feelings-of-well-being?/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/09/28/photography-and-feng-shui-for-interior-design/

Photographs used in this post are copyrighted by Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography, 2010, All Rights Reserved. Reproduction in any manner is prohibited without the written permission of Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography. My image catalog can be viewed at http://www.rangeofvisionphotos.com. You can contact me through this blog or through email at: wayne@rangeofvisionphotos.com

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Vibrant wall décor can promote a higher level of upbeat energy in your surroundings. If you are looking for vivid accent colors try a photographic print that will give you’re psyche a little boost in concentration or inspire a strong sense of purpose in your home space or work environment.

In the art of Feng Shui placement the color orange, which is a mix of yellow and red, could be what you are looking for. In this ancient practice of presentation and channeling of positive energies in one’s life, orange, has been established as the color that best symbolizes these affirmative energy levels.

Double Orange Poppy profile garden flower

Double Orange Poppy 11x17 Print

Orange is a pretty strong fire color but it is definitely less aggressive than red. Obviously an orange painted wall may still be a bit much for most situations however an orange accent image or a triptych series of Giclee prints on watercolor paper or canvas can bring in an awareness of a fire element that is needed to add a cheerful tone to social conversations and good time feelings.

Certainly, this is a subtle thing. Just because you display a print that has a large area of orange does not mean that suddenly you will have greater powers of concentration and your get-togethers’ will be more joyous. It is in combination with other Feng Shui practices that illustrate how you really can target energy flows.

In winter to many people the color orange reminds them of a fire’s glow and a cheerful feeling is expressed when viewing images that employ this tone. Orange is actually a soft color and is easy to live with.  Warm amber light from sunsets streaming in your windows or incandescent lighting can illuminate its nurturing feelings and give a real spark to orange accent pieces.

Garden patch double orange poppies

Double Orange Poppy Patch 11x17 print

An easy way to incorporate orange and nature images into your space is through the use of flowers like these Oriental Double Poppies shown here. Poppies, too, have their own symbols and uses.

Poppies have been cultivated for thousands of years as ornamental garden plants. They include many other colors besides orange and range from dark solids to soft pastels of many shades. Their long stems and large cup shaped flowers are a lively, playful feature in any garden as they dance in the breeze.

So if you have a preference for warm florals try featuring a bit of orange in the form of Giclee prints that can contribute to increased energy levels and build a natural atmosphere that is mentally stimulating and sociable. They will get people talking.

Related Posts:

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/11/17/purple-an-element-of-fire/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/09/11/can-color-photgraphs-enhance-positive-feelings-of-well-being?/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/09/28/photography-and-feng-shui-for-interior-design/

Photographs used in this post are copyrighted by Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography, 2010, All Rights Reserved. Reproduction in any manner is prohibited without the written permission of Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography. My image catalog can be viewed at http://www.rangeofvisionphotos.com. You can contact me through this blog or through email at: wayne@rangeofvisionphotos.com

Read Full Post »