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Archive for June, 2010

As a follow up to my last post,” Vision and Experimentation Creates Expression”, I wanted to make note of another photo session in an effort to push my thoughts on what makes a Fine Art Photography print and how to expand my interpretation of landscape images.

Driving back from Missoula to Bozeman, Montana last weekend I took a detour and drove the Pintler Scenic Route, MT Hwy 1. Through the Sapphire Mountains and along Georgetown Lake’s cobalt blue waters where the views were mostly pine forest and snow capped peaks.

I had photographed the area many times before when I was the publisher of a regional travel guide some years back.  It was the familiarity of the scene that was a problem for me. I didn’t want the same style landscape I already had in my stock files.

aspen grove abstract landscape image

Aspen Grove Abstract Giclee Print

In making a change from a photojournalist to fine art photographer I am always trying to leave behind a documentary style of communication to a more interpretive and personal one. I am always asking what if?

Among the tens of thousands of pine trees I found a small grove of aspens dressed in bright spring green color.  I have more than a dozen aspen grove images in all seasons. What could I do that would be different this time?

Walking along the road I felt the sense of movement of the aspens in my vision. How could I capture this feeling and compose it in the viewfinder?

Setting up my tripod I began panning across the trees. With a slow shutter speed of ¼ second I exposed a shot.  It just wasn’t the right motion.

I stood there and stared at the white bark surrounded by fluttering green leaves. Then the image came. A vertical pan or tilt with the same shutter speed.

It captured the mood I felt and it was visually different from my stock landscapes of aspens.

Experimenting, trying something a bit unorthodox is always a good thing. It doesn’t matter if the results work or not as an image that communicates. The point is that you try something different to make changes in your vision.

Expand awareness of your surroundings be in the moment and the images will reach out to you as connections are made.

Related Posts:

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2010/06/10/vision-and-experimentation-creates-expression/

 https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2010/03/22/twenty-minute-challenge-photograph-an-orchid/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2010/02/21/use-red-accent-photographs-to-capture-attention/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2010/1/12/what-can-orange-do-for-you?/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/11/17/purple-an-element-of-fire/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/09/11/can-color-photgraphs-enhance-positive-feelings-of-well-being?/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/09/28/photography-and-feng-shui-for-interior-design/

Photographs used in this post are copyrighted by Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography, 2010, All Rights Reserved. Reproduction in any manner is prohibited without the written permission of Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography. My image catalog can be viewed at http://www.rangeofvisionphotos.com. You can contact me through this blog or email at: wayne@rangeofvisionphotos.com

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I have read that the key to a creative effort is trying to achieve what your imagination sees. This can be a challenge. 

Working on extremes of color is one way to enhance creative vision. This is especially true when working with abstract images where you can be free to experiment in different ways such as increasing or decreasing color hue and saturation, middle tone adjustments or contrast levels.

Apricot Tulip petals

Apricot Tulip Petals

Seeing color in your imagination is one way to begin to make your images more expressive. This is called color interpretation and boosting saturation levels in individual colors is a good starting point to see how an image can evolve into something that can be a bit surreal in impact or subtle and softer in presentation.

Sometimes the simple task of adjusting individual channels for color alterations will give you the most dramatic changes that correspond to your ideas and thoughts of expression.

On the apricot tulip petals, illustrated, the original image had a faded orange-yellow cast that I felt required a little manipulation to match what my imagination saw when I composed the photograph.

I enhanced just the red saturation channel which gave the image just a bit more visual texture adding more impact to the overall interpretation.  By adding the red and then a bit of contrast I now felt that the image conveyed what I saw, or wanted to see, in the viewfinder.

White Iris

White Iris

The iris image actually had slight lavender cast along its white inner petals that caught my attention. I cropped the image to isolate the subtlety I was after and increased the magenta hue and saturation levels. This picked up the delicate color quality giving the image just a bit more dimension and depth.

A very pastel larkspur floral image was originally desaturated from the overall capture. The middle tones were devalued then just the magenta hue channel was adjusted which saturated and isolated the flower from a distracting background.

The color enhancements used on these images became part of a series of prints that delivered a nice velvety appearance when printed on Museo matte archival watercolor substrate.

Pastel Larkspur Flower

Pastel Larkspur

The most important part of experimenting is really how it makes you feel. You do not need an audience although of course this is nice to be able to communicate your vision to others. If the image completes your expression of the scene then that is all that matters. The image is pure and successful.

Good photography requires an understanding and application of the principles of color and design – this takes intuition, study and experience. It is through the knowledge of your craft and how you use it that creates the art expressed in your soul. It holds our attention and makes us feel.

Related Posts:

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2010/03/22/twenty-minute-challenge-%e2%80%93-photograph-an-orchid/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2010/02/21/use-red-accent-photographs-to-capture-attention/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2010/1/12/what-can-orange-do-for-you?/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/11/17/purple-an-element-of-fire/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/09/11/can-color-photgraphs-enhance-positive-feelings-of-well-being?/

https://myphotovisions.wordpress.com/2009/09/28/photography-and-feng-shui-for-interior-design/

Photographs used in this post are copyrighted by Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography, 2010, All Rights Reserved. Reproduction in any manner is prohibited without the written permission of Wayne Scherr, Range of Vision Photography. My image catalog can be viewed at http://www.rangeofvisionphotos.com. You can contact me through this blog or email at: wayne@rangeofvisionphotos.com

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